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"Point in Time" Regulation Content

Workers Compensation Act

Occupational Health and Safety Regulation

B.C. Reg. 296/97

NOTE: Links below go to reg content as it was prior to the changes made on the effective date. (PIT covers changes made from September 19, 2009 to present)
SECTIONEFFECTIVE DATE
Section 1.1 February 1, 2011
October 16, 2012
August 4, 2015
May 1, 2017
Section 3.4 February 1, 2016
Section 4.1.1 February 1, 2011
February 1, 2015
Section 4.17 August 4, 2015
Section 4.18 February 1, 2011
Section 4.22.1 February 1, 2011
April 15, 2012
Section 4.23 April 15, 2012
Section 4.42 February 1, 2011
Section 4.43.1 January 1, 2018
Section 4.54 February 1, 2011
Section 4.56 May 1, 2017
Section 4.58 February 1, 2011
Section 4.69 February 1, 2015
Section 4.80.1 May 1, 2017
Section 4.81 May 1, 2017
Section 4.82 May 1, 2017
Part 4 Schedule 4-A February 1, 2011
Section 5.1 August 4, 2015
Section 5.1.1 February 1, 2011
Section 5.2 August 4, 2015
Section 5.3 February 1, 2015
August 4, 2015
Section 5.4 August 4, 2015
Section 5.5 August 4, 2015
Section 5.6 August 4, 2015
Section 5.7 August 4, 2015
Section 5.8 August 4, 2015
Section 5.9 August 4, 2015
Section 5.10 August 4, 2015
Section 5.11 August 4, 2015
Section 5.12 August 4, 2015
Section 5.13 August 4, 2015
Section 5.14 August 4, 2015
Section 5.15 August 4, 2015
Section 5.16 August 4, 2015
Section 5.16.1 August 4, 2015
Section 5.17 August 4, 2015
Section 5.18 August 4, 2015
Section 5.19 August 4, 2015
Section 5.27 February 1, 2015
May 1, 2017
June 3, 2019
Section 5.50 February 1, 2012
Section 5.71 May 1, 2017
Section 5.76 August 4, 2015
Section 5.77 August 4, 2015
Section 5.78 August 4, 2015
Section 5.79 August 4, 2015
Table 5-2 August 4, 2015
Section 5.98 August 4, 2015
Section 6.1 February 1, 2012
Section 6.2 February 1, 2012
Section 6.4 February 1, 2012
May 1, 2017
Section 6.5 May 1, 2017
Section 6.6 February 1, 2012
May 1, 2017
Section 6.7 February 1, 2012
Section 6.9 February 1, 2012
Section 6.10 February 1, 2012
Section 6.12 February 1, 2012
Section 6.16 February 1, 2012
Section 6.18 February 1, 2012
Section 6.20 February 1, 2012
Section 6.24 February 1, 2012
Section 6.27 February 1, 2012
Section 6.29 February 1, 2011
Section 6.32 February 1, 2012
May 1, 2017
Section 6.34 February 1, 2011
Section 6.37 August 4, 2015
Section 6.58.1 May 1, 2017
Section 6.59 May 1, 2017
Section 6.59.1 May 1, 2017
Section 6.60 May 1, 2017
Section 6.60.1 May 1, 2017
Section 6.61 February 1, 2011
May 1, 2017
Section 6.61.1 May 1, 2017
Section 6.62 May 1, 2017
Section 6.63 May 1, 2017
Section 6.64 May 1, 2017
Section 6.65 May 1, 2017
Section 6.66 May 1, 2017
Section 6.75 August 4, 2015
Section 6.77 February 1, 2012
Section 6.108 August 4, 2015
Section 6.110 May 1, 2017
Section 6.111 May 1, 2017
Section 6.112 May 1, 2017
Section 6.112.1 May 1, 2017
Section 6.112.2 May 1, 2017
Section 6.112.3 May 1, 2017
Section 6.112.4 May 1, 2017
Section 6.112.5 May 1, 2017
Section 6.112.6 May 1, 2017
Section 6.112.7 May 1, 2017
Section 6.114 May 1, 2017
Section 6.115.1 May 1, 2017
Section 6.116 August 4, 2015
Section 6.127 February 1, 2011
Section 6.128 February 1, 2012
Section 8.1 February 1, 2011
Section 8.5 February 1, 2011
Section 8.6 February 1, 2011
Section 8.21 February 1, 2011
Section 8.32 February 1, 2011
Section 8.33 February 1, 2011
Section 8.34 February 1, 2011
Part 8 Schedule 8-A February 1, 2011
Section 8.11 June 3, 2019
Section 8.14 June 3, 2019
Section 8.15 June 3, 2019
Section 8.16 June 3, 2019
Section 8.17 June 3, 2019
June 3, 2019
Section 8.29 June 3, 2019
Section 9.1 August 4, 2015
Section 9.18 February 1, 2011
Section 9.18.1 February 1, 2011
Section 9.22 February 1, 2011
Section 9.25 February 1, 2012
Section 9.26 February 1, 2012
Section 9.29 February 1, 2011
Section 11.1 April 1, 2013
Section 11.2 February 1, 2015
Section 11.6 April 1, 2013
Section 11.10 April 1, 2013
Section 12.14 August 4, 2015
Section 12.60 February 1, 2013
Section 12.70 February 1, 2012
Section 12.80.2 February 1, 2011
Section 12.83.1 May 1, 2017
Section 12.111 February 1, 2011
Section 12.124 February 1, 2011
Section 12.135 February 1, 2011
Section 12.173 and 12.174 February 1, 2013
Section 12.175 to 12.183 February 1, 2015
Section 13.5 February 1, 2015
Section 13.11 May 1, 2017
Section 13.20 February 1, 2013
Section 13.23 February 1, 2013
Section 13.30 February 1, 2013
Section 13.32 February 1, 2011
February 1, 2015
Section 14.1 February 1, 2012
May 1, 2017
Section 14.2 February 1, 2012
May 1, 2017
Section 14.5 May 1, 2017
Section 14.11 May 1, 2017
Section 14.81 May 1, 2017
Section 14.116 February 1, 2012
Section 14.117 February 1, 2012
Section 14.119 February 1, 2012
Schedule 14-A February 1, 2012
Section 15.6 February 1, 2011
Section 15.9 February 1, 2011
Section 15.23 February 1, 2012
Section 15.30 February 1, 2011
Section 16.3 February 1, 2013
Section 16.7 February 1, 2013
Section 16.8 February 1, 2011
Section 16.8.1 February 1, 2011
Section 16.31 February 1, 2012
Section 19.1 February 1, 2011
Section 19.9 February 1, 2013
Section 19.10 February 1, 2013
Section 19.15 February 1, 2011
Section 19.24 February 1, 2011
Section 19.24.1 February 1, 2011
Section 19.24.2 February 1, 2011
Section 19.25 February 1, 2011
Section 19.26 February 1, 2011
February 1, 2012
Section 19.29 February 1, 2011
Section 19.30 February 1, 2011
Section 19.32 February 1, 2011
Section 19.33 February 1, 2011
Section 19.34 February 1, 2013
Section 19.34.1 February 1, 2013
Section 20.1 February 1, 2012
June 3, 2019
Section 20.2 February 1, 2012
May 1, 2017
Section 20.2.1 May 1, 2017
Section 20.16 June 3, 2019
Section 20.16.1 June 3, 2019
Section 20.16.2 June 3, 2019
Section 20.17 June 3, 2019
Section 20.18 June 3, 2019
Section 20.19 June 3, 2019
Section 20.20 June 3, 2019
Section 20.21 June 3, 2019
Section 20.22 June 3, 2019
Section 20.23 June 3, 2019
Section 20.24 June 3, 2019
Section 20.25 June 3, 2019
Section 20.26 February 1, 2015
June 3, 2019
Section 20.26.1-20.26.3 February 1, 2012
Section 20.27 February 1, 2012
Section 20.28 February 1, 2012
Section 20.29 February 1, 2012
Section 20.30 February 1, 2012
Section 20.30.1 February 1, 2012
Section 20.31 February 1, 2012
Section 20.32 February 1, 2012
Section 20.36 February 1, 2012
Section 20.40 February 1, 2012
Section 20.41 February 1, 2012
Section 20.47 February 1, 2012
June 3, 2019
Section 20.48 February 1, 2012
Section 20.48.1 February 1, 2012
Section 20.50-20.52 February 1, 2012
Section 20.79 February 1, 2011
Section 20.112 February 1, 2012
February 1, 2015
Section 20.113 February 1, 2011
Section 21.1 June 3, 2019
Section 21.3 June 3, 2019
Section 21.24 June 3, 2019
Section 21.25 February 1, 2012
Section 21.55 June 3, 2019
Section 21.58 June 3, 2019
Section 21.59 June 3, 2019
Section 21.60 June 3, 2019
Section 21.61 June 3, 2019
Section 21.62 June 3, 2019
Section 21.63 June 3, 2019
Section 21.63.1 June 3, 2019
Section 21.67 June 3, 2019
Section 21.69 June 3, 2019
Section 21.71 June 3, 2019
Section 21.72 June 3, 2019
Section 21.73 June 3, 2019
Section 21.84 June 3, 2019
Section 22.1 May 1, 2017
Section 22.12 May 1, 2017
Section 22.12.1 May 1, 2017
Section 22.63 May 1, 2017
Section 22.67 May 1, 2017
Section 23.1 August 1, 2017
Section 23.6 August 1, 2017
Section 23.15 February 1, 2012
February 1, 2013
Section 23.16 February 1, 2013
Section 23.22 June 3, 2019
Section 23.26.1 August 1, 2017
Section 23.63 June 3, 2019
Section 23.69 August 1, 2017
Section 23.69.1 August 1, 2017
Section 23.69.2 August 1, 2017
Section 23.69.3 August 1, 2017
Section 23.70 August 1, 2017
Section 23.72 August 1, 2017
Section 23.83 February 1, 2011
Section 24.1 June 3, 2019
Section 24.21 June 3, 2019
Section 24.34 February 1, 2016
Section 24.69 June 3, 2019
Section 24.69.1 June 3, 2019
Section 24.69.2 June 3, 2019
Section 24.69.3 June 3, 2019
Section 24.128 June 3, 2019
Section 24.96.1 June 3, 2019
Section 24.96.2 June 3, 2019
Section 24.96.3 June 3, 2019
Part 26 Table 26-8 June 3, 2019
Section 26.1 May 1, 2017
Section 26.13.4 May 1, 2017
Section 26.18 February 1, 2011
Section 26.65 February 1, 2015
Section 26.83 February 1, 2013
Section 26.83.1 February 1, 2013
Section 28.9 May 1, 2017
Section 28.12 February 1, 2015
Section 28.41 February 1, 2012
Section 29.16 June 3, 2019
Section 30.1 February 1, 2011
Section 30.12 February 1, 2011
Section 30.13 January 1, 2001
February 1, 2011
Section 30.14 February 1, 2011
Section 30.15 February 1, 2011
Section 30.16 February 1, 2011
Section 30.17 February 1, 2011
Section 30.19 February 1, 2011
Section 30.26 February 1, 2011
Part 34 February 1, 2015
Section 34.4 June 3, 2019
Section 34.14 June 3, 2019

 Section 1.1 definition of "qualified registered professional", paragraph (b) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(b) in relation to a forestry operation, a person referred to in paragraph (a) or a professional forester or holder of a special permit under the Foresters Act;

 Section 1.1 definition of "utility service" was added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 1.1 BEFORE renumbered as 1.1 (1) and definition of "resource road", and subsections (2), (3) and (4) were added by BC Reg 305/2012, effective October 16, 2012.

 Definitions

1.1  In this Occupational Health and Safety Regulation:

"administrative controls" means the provision, use and scheduling of work activities and resources in the workplace, including planning, organizing, staffing and coordinating, for the purpose of controlling risk;

"Board" means the Workers' Compensation Board;

"combustible liquid" means a substance which meets the criteria for WHMIS Class B Division 3 combustible liquid (a flash point of 37.8° C (100° F) or more but less than 93.3° C (200° F));

"contaminant" means a harmful or irritant material, or nuisance dust, foreign to the normal composition of a substance, or a material that varies the normal proportions of components in a mixture such as air;

"controlled product" means a product, material or substance specified by regulations made pursuant to section 15 (1) (a) of the Hazardous Products Act (Canada) as products, materials and substances included in any of the classes listed in Schedule II of that Act;

"engineering controls" means the physical arrangement, design or alteration of workstations, equipment, materials, production facilities or other aspects of the physical work environment, for the purpose of controlling risk;

"flammable liquid" means a substance which meets the criterion for WHMIS Class B Division 2 flammable liquid (a flash point less than 37.8° C (100° F));

"hazard" means a thing or condition that may expose a person to a risk of injury or occupational disease;

"hazard area" means an area in a workplace where a hazard exists, or is created, due to a condition in the area or the activities conducted in it;

"HEPA" means, in reference to air filtration, a high efficiency particulate air filter meeting the specifications of a nuclear grade filter, providing a 99.97% filtration efficiency at a 0.3 micrometre particle size;

"IDLH atmosphere" means an atmosphere containing a substance at a concentration which is immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) because the concentration is greater than that from which one could escape without any escape-impairing symptoms or irreversible health effects, and includes an atmosphere with an unknown concentration with the potential to be immediately dangerous to life or health;

"incident" includes an accident or other occurrence which resulted in or had the potential for causing an injury or occupational disease;

"material safety data sheet" or "MSDS" means a document disclosing the information referred to in section 13 (a) (i) to (v) of the Hazardous Products Act (Canada) and section 12 (1) to (3) of the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada);

"mg/m3" means milligrams of a substance per cubic metre of air;

"oxygen deficient" means, in relation to air, a condition in which there is less than 19.5% oxygen by volume, or the partial pressure of oxygen is less than 16.3 kPa (122 mm Hg);

"ppm" means parts of a vapour or a gas per million parts of contaminated air by volume at a temperature of 25 degrees Celsius and an atmospheric pressure of 760 millimetres of mercury;

"practicable" means that which is reasonably capable of being done;

"professional engineer" means a person who is registered or licensed to practice engineering under the provisions of the Engineers and Geoscientists Act;

"professional geoscientist" means a professional geoscientist or licensee under the Engineers and Geoscientists Act;

"qualified" means being knowledgeable of the work, the hazards involved and the means to control the hazards, by reason of education, training, experience or a combination thereof;

"qualified registered professional" means

(a) a professional engineer or professional geoscientist, and

(b) in relation to a forestry operation, a person referred to in paragraph (a) or a registered professional forester, registered forest technologist or holder of a special permit under the Foresters Act;

"rated capacity" or "rated load" means the load that machinery or a piece of equipment is, in accordance with its design, rated to bear under section 4.8;

"risk" means a chance of injury or occupational disease;

"sensitizer" means a substance that has been shown to elicit an allergenic type of response in humans after an initial exposure, resulting in development of symptoms upon subsequent exposure at much lower concentrations;

"supervisor" means a person who instructs, directs and controls workers in the performance of their duties;

"utility service" means a petroleum pipeline, sanitary sewer line, enclosed storm sewer, water line, steam line or electrical cable;

"working load limit" or "WLL" means the maximum load which a product is authorized by the manufacturer to support in a particular service.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 1; 253/2001, s. 1; 312/2003, App. C, s. 1; 315/2003, App. A, s. 1; 20/2008, App. A, s. 59; 258/2008, App. A, s. 1; 312/2010, Apps. A and D, s. 1.]

 Section 1.1 (1) definitions of "controlled product" and ""material safety data sheet" or "MSDS"" BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

"controlled product" means a product, material or substance specified by regulations made pursuant to section 15 (1) (a) of the Hazardous Products Act (Canada) as products, materials and substances included in any of the classes listed in Schedule II of that Act;

"material safety data sheet" or "MSDS" means a document disclosing the information referred to in section 13 (a) (i) to (v) of the Hazardous Products Act (Canada) and section 12 (1) to (3) of the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada);

 Section 1.1 (1) definitions of "hazardous product", ""safety data sheet" or "SDS"" and "WHMIS" were added by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

 Section 1.1 (1) definitions of "combustible liquid" and "flammable liquid" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

"combustible liquid" means a substance which meets the criteria for WHMIS Class B Division 3 combustible liquid (a flash point of 37.8°C (100°F) or more but less than 93.3°C (200°F));

"flammable liquid" means a substance which meets the criterion for WHMIS Class B Division 2 flammable liquid (a flash point less than 37.8°C (100°F));

 Section 1.1 (1) definition of "B.C. Electrical Code" was added by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 3.4 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 195/2015, effective February 1, 2016.

Incident investigation reports

3.4   (1) An employer must ensure that an incident investigation report required by Division 10 of Part 3 of the Workers Compensation Act contains

(a) the place, date and time of the incident,

(b) the names and job titles of persons injured in the incident,

(c) the names of witnesses,

(d) a brief description of the incident,

(e) a statement of the sequence of events which preceded the incident,

(f) identification of any unsafe conditions, acts or procedures which contributed in any manner to the incident,

(g) recommended corrective actions to prevent similar incidents, and

(h) the names of the persons who investigated the incident.

(2) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 14.]

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 14.]

 Section 4.1.1 definition of "qualified avalanche planner" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

"qualified avalanche planner" means a person

(a) who has training and experience in the development and implementation of active avalanche safety programs and is

(i)  a professional member of the Canadian Avalanche Association,

(ii)  a certified guide and a member of the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides,

(iii)  a certified guide and a member of the Canadian Ski Guide Association, or

(iv)  a qualified registered professional, and

(b) who, on and after September 1, 2011, meets the requirements of the CAA Recommended Minimum Training and Experience for Qualified Avalanche Planners published by the Canadian Avalanche Association in August 2008.

 Section 4.1.1 (2) (a) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(a) for workplaces involving buildings, construction, logging, transportation corridors or other work areas that will be occupied by any person working in the workplace on a permanent, seasonal or scheduled basis, by a qualified registered professional and a qualified avalanche planner;

 Section 4.1.1 (9) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(9)  On and after September 1, 2011, every active avalanche safety program approved before September 1, 2011 must have been prepared by, or reviewed and approved by, a qualified avalanche planner who meets the requirements of the CAA Recommended Minimum Training and Experience for Qualified Avalanche Planners published by the Canadian Avalanche Association in August 2008.

 Section 4.1.1 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

Snow avalanche assessment

4.1.1   (1) In this section:

"active avalanche safety program" means a program for monitoring daily, or more frequently if conditions warrant, the weather, snow and avalanche conditions, determining temporal fluctuations of avalanche hazards and implementing safety measures, closures or other methods specified in the program to reduce avalanche risk that has not been mitigated through use of passive measures;

"avalanche" means snow avalanche;

"avalanche risk assessment" means an assessment, done in accordance with CAA guidelines, of the terrain in and surrounding a workplace to determine if any person working at the workplace is at risk from a snow avalanche;

"avalanche risk zone" means a workplace or part of a workplace where an avalanche risk assessment determines that avalanches pose a risk to any person working at the workplace and risk control measures are required to make the area safe for work to be conducted;

"avalanche safety plan" means a documented plan meeting CAA guidelines, specifying passive measures to mitigate or reduce the avalanche risk to any person working at the workplace and any active avalanche safety program necessary to monitor and manage any avalanche risk that has not been mitigated through use of passive measures;

"CAA guidelines" means the Canadian Avalanche Association guidelines for risk determination, mapping and mitigation for snow avalanche risks as specified in the Guidelines for Snow Avalanche Risk Determination and Mapping in Canada and the Land Managers Guide to Snow Avalanche Hazards in Canada, published by the Canadian Avalanche Association in 2002;

"passive measures" means the application of CAA guidelines and other relevant standards and practices in engineering, geoscience and forestry to worksite and facility planning, location, design and use to mitigate or reduce the risk from avalanches without reliance on an active avalanche safety program, and may include the design and construction of physical defenses against avalanches;

"qualified avalanche planner" means either of the following:

(a) a qualified registered professional;

(b) a person who

(i) has training and experience in the development and implementation of active avalanche safety programs and is

(A) a professional member of the Canadian Avalanche Association,

(B) a certified guide and a member of the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides, or

(C) a certified guide and a member of the Canadian Ski Guide Association, and

(ii) on and after September 1, 2011, meets the requirements of the CAA Recommended Minimum Training and Experience for Qualified Avalanche Planners published by the Canadian Avalanche Association in August 2008.

(2) Before work commences in a workplace where there is or may be a risk from an avalanche to a person working in the workplace, an avalanche risk assessment must be prepared as follows:

(a) for workplaces involving buildings, construction, logging, transportation corridors or other work areas that will be occupied by any person working in the workplace on a permanent, seasonal or scheduled basis, by a qualified registered professional;

(b) for wilderness operations where any person working in the workplace undertakes short-duration activities in undeveloped terrain, by a qualified avalanche planner.

(3) If an avalanche risk assessment conducted under subsection (2) identifies an avalanche risk zone, no work may be conducted in the avalanche risk zone at any time when snow conditions have the potential to create an avalanche unless an avalanche safety plan has been developed and implemented.

(4) If any part of an avalanche safety plan

(a) requires passive measures, that part must be prepared by a qualified registered professional, and

(b) requires an active avalanche safety program, that part must be prepared by a qualified avalanche planner.

(5) If the avalanche safety plan required by subsection (3) includes an active avalanche safety program, a copy of that active avalanche safety program must be readily available to each person who administers or implements the avalanche safety program for the workplace.

(6) An avalanche safety plan must be reviewed to ensure that the plan is appropriate and relevant to the conditions and activities for the workplace as follows:

(a) whenever there is a significant change to the workplace activities contemplated by the plan;

(b) whenever there is a significant change to the surface terrain or forest cover in or surrounding the workplace.

(7) An active avalanche safety program must be reviewed to ensure that the program is appropriate and relevant to the conditions and activities for the workplace at least once every 60 months.

(8) The review required under subsection (6) or (7) must have any passive measures reviewed by a qualified registered professional and any active avalanche safety program reviewed by a qualified avalanche planner, and following the review the avalanche safety plan must be amended as necessary by the person or persons who conducted the review.

(9) On and after September 1, 2011, every active avalanche safety program approved before September 1, 2011 must have been prepared by, or reviewed and approved by,

(a) a qualified registered professional, or

(b) a qualified avalanche planner who is not a qualified registered professional but who meets the requirements of the CAA Recommended Minimum Training and Experience for Qualified Avalanche Planners published by the Canadian Avalanche Association in August 2008.

(10) If an avalanche safety plan specifies procedures to be followed by persons working in an avalanche risk zone, each person working in the risk zone must be trained in, and comply with, any procedures applicable to that person's work.

[en. B.C. Reg. 258/2008, App. A, s. 3; am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. C, s. 1.]

 Section 4.17 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

(1) An employer having at a workplace controlled products covered by WHMIS, explosives, pesticides, radioactive material, consumer products or hazardous wastes in quantities which may endanger firefighters, must ensure the local fire department is notified of the nature and location of the hazardous materials or substances and methods to be used in their safe handling.

 Section 4.18 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Notification of utilities

4.18  An employer whose work activities result in a hit or damage to a pipeline, buried electrical cable or other such utility must notify the owner of the utility without delay.

 Section 4.22.1 (1) definition of "late night hours" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

"late night hours" means any time between 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.;

 Section 4.22.1 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 230/2011, effective April 15, 2012.

 Late night retail safety procedures and requirements

4.22.1  (1)  In this section:

"late night hours" means any time between 11:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.;

"late night retail premises" means

(a) a gas station or other retail fueling outlet, or

(b) a convenience store or any other retail store where goods are sold directly to consumers

that is open to the public for late night hours.

(2)  If a worker is assigned to work alone or in isolation in late night retail premises and there is any risk of harm from a violent act to the worker, then, in addition to any other obligations the employer has under sections 4.20.2 to 4.23,

(a) the employer must develop and implement a written procedure to ensure the worker's safety in handling money, and

(b) when that worker is assigned to work late night hours, the employer must also do either or both of the following:

(i)  ensure that the worker is physically separated from the public by a locked door or barrier that prevents physical contact with or access to the worker;

(ii)  assign one or more workers to work with the worker during that worker's assignment.

(3)  A worker described in subsection (2) must be trained in the written procedure referred to in that subsection.

[en. B.C. Reg. 318/2007, s. 4; am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. B.]

 Section 4.23 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 230/2011, effective April 15, 2012.

 Annual reviews of procedures

4.23  The procedures referred to in sections 4.21 and 4.22.1 must be reviewed at least annually, or more frequently if there is

(a) a change in work arrangements which could adversely affect a worker's well-being or safety, or

(b) a report that the procedures are not working effectively.

[en. B.C. Reg. 318/2007, s. 5.]

 Section 4.42 (4) (b) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(b) appropriate respiratory and eye protection is worn, and

 Section 4.43.1 was enacted by BC Reg 143/2017, effective January 1, 2018.

 Section 4.54 definition of "guardrail" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

"guardrail" means a guard consisting of a top rail 102 cm to 112 cm (40 in to 44 in) above the work surface, and an intermediate rail located approximately midway between the underside of the top rail and the top of the toeboard, if one is provided, or the work surface if no toeboard is provided.

 Section 4.56 (c) was added by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 4.58 (3) and (4) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(3)  Unless otherwise permitted by subsection (4), guardrails must be installed to withstand a load applied horizontally and normal to the span of the rail, of 550 N (125 lbs) applied at any point along the rail, and a vertical, downward load of 1.5 kN per m (100 lbs per ft) along the top rail, but the horizontal and vertical loads need not be considered to act simultaneously.

(4)  Guardrails temporarily installed during the construction, demolition or renovation of a work area must

(a) be able to withstand a load of 550 N (125 lbs) applied perpendicular to the span in a horizontal or vertically downward direction at any point on the top rail, or be built to the criteria of subsection (5), and

(b) not be made of fibre or wire rope without the prior approval of the Board.

 Section 4.58 (4.1) was added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 4.69 (4) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

(4) The emergency lighting system must be inspected, tested and maintained to meet the requirements of section 6.8 (Emergency Power Systems and Unit Equipment for Emergency Lighting) of the BC Fire Code.

 Heading above Section 4.80.1 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Environmental Tobacco Smoke

 Section 4.80.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 4.81 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Controlling exposure

4.81   The employer must control the exposure of workers at any workplace to environmental tobacco smoke by

(a) prohibiting smoking in the workplace,

(b) restricting smoking to a safe outdoor location that is a minimum of 3 metres from a doorway, window or air intake of an indoor workplace, subject to section 4.22 (3) of the Tobacco Control Regulation, B.C. Reg. 232/2007, and

(c) prohibiting working in an indoor area where smoking is allowed under section 4.23 (2) (a) or (b) of the Tobacco Control Regulation, except as permitted in section 4.82 of this regulation.

[am. B.C. Reg. 258/2008, App. B, s. 1.]

 Section 4.82 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Exceptions

4.82   (1) An employer must ensure that a worker does not work in an indoor area where smoking is permitted under section 4.23 (2) (a) or (b) of the Tobacco Control Regulation, B.C. Reg. 232/2007, unless

(a) the worker must enter the area to respond to an emergency endangering life, health or property,

(b) the worker must enter the area to investigate for illegal activity, or

(c) the tobacco smoke has been effectively removed.

(2) If necessary to prevent tobacco smoke from entering a workplace, a room where smoking is permitted under section 4.23 (2) (a) of the Tobacco Control Regulation, B.C. Reg. 232/2007, must be provided with a separate, non-recirculating exhaust ventilation system that

(a) is designed in accordance with expected occupancy rates,

(b) maintains adequate air flows from non-smoking to smoking areas,

(c) discharges directly to the outdoors, and

(d) meets all other requirements for a smoking lounge

specified in the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers Standard 62-1989, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality.

[en. B.C. Reg. 258/2008, App. B, s. 2.]

 Part 4, schedule 4-A was by added BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 5.1, definitions of "commission" and "risk phase" BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

"commission" means the Hazardous Materials Information Review Commission established under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (Canada);

"risk phrase" means, for a controlled product or a class, division or subdivision of controlled products, a statement identifying a hazard that may arise from the nature of the controlled product or the class, division or subdivision of controlled products;

 Section 5.1, definitions of "bulk shipment", "compressed gas", "flammable gas", "fugitive emission", "hazard information", "hazardous waste", "label", "manufactured article", "product identifier", "readily available", "supplier label" and "workplace label" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

"bulk shipment" means a shipment of a controlled product that is contained, without intermediate containment or intermediate packaging, in

(a) a vessel with a water capacity of more than 454 litres (100 imp gal),

(b) a freight container, a portable tank, a road vehicle, a railway vehicle, a ship, a barge or other type of vessel or an aircraft, or

(c) a pipeline;

"compressed gas" means a substance which meets the criteria for WHMIS Class A compressed gas;

"flammable gas" means a substance which meets the criteria for WHMIS Class B Division 1 flammable gas, (a compressed gas with an upper flammable limit of 13% or less or with an explosive range of 12% or more);

"fugitive emission" means a gas, liquid, solid, vapour, fume, mist, fog or dust that escapes from process equipment, emission control equipment or from a product;

"hazard information" means information on the proper and safe use, storage and handling of a controlled product and includes information related to its toxicological properties;

"hazardous waste" means a controlled product that is intended for disposal, or is sold for recycling or recovery;

"label" includes a mark, sign, device, stamp, seal, sticker, ticket, tag or wrapper;

"manufactured article" means an article that is formed to a specific shape or design during manufacture, the intended use of which, when in that form, is dependent in whole or in part on its shape or design, and that, under normal conditions of use, will not release or otherwise cause a person to be exposed to a controlled product;

"product identifier" means, for a controlled product, the brand name, code name or code number specified by a supplier, or the chemical name, common name, generic name or trade name;

"readily available" means, when used in connection with an MSDS, available in a place where a person can easily access and study the information it contains;

"supplier label" means a label provided by a supplier that complies with the requirements, discloses the information and displays the hazard symbols referred to in section 13 (b) of the Hazardous Products Act (Canada), sections 16, 17, 19, and 20 of the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada), and section 5.13 of this Regulation;

"workplace label" means a label that discloses a product identifier and information for the safe handling of a controlled product, and that indicates that an MSDS, if supplied or produced, is available.

 Section 5.1, definitions of "CAS registry number", "container", ""Hazardous Materials Information Review Act" or "HMIRA"", ""Hazardous Products Act" or "HPA"", ""Hazardous Products Regulation" or "HPR"", "laboratory sample" and "significant new data" were added by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

 Section 5.1.1 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

5.1.1  For the purposes of sections 5.2 and 6.33 to 6.40, the following biological agents are designated as hazardous substances:

(a) a liquid or solid material that is contaminated with a prion, virus, bacterium, fungus or other biological agent that has a classification given by the World Health Organization or Health Canada, as amended from time to time, as a Risk Group 2, 3 or 4 human pathogen that causes an adverse health effect;

(b) a biological toxin that causes an adverse health effect.

 Section 5.2 (a) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

(a) the identity of the chemical agent or biological agent, its possible effects on worker health and safety and any precautions required to protect the health and safety of the worker are clearly indicated by labels, MSDSs, or other similar means,

 Section 5.3 (2) (d) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

(d) a prescribed substance within the meaning of the Atomic Energy Control Act (Canada) or any successor legislation, or

 Section 5.3 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Application

5.3   (1) Sections 5.3 to 5.19 (the WHMIS Requirements) apply to employers and workers with respect to controlled products used, stored or handled at a workplace, except as provided in subsections (2) to (4).

(2) The provisions concerning a supplier label and MSDS do not apply if the controlled product is

(a) an explosive within the meaning of the Explosives Act (Canada),

(b) a cosmetic, device, drug or food within the meaning of the Food and Drugs Act (Canada),

(c) a control product within the meaning of the Pest Control Products Act (Canada),

(d) a nuclear substance, within the meaning of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (Canada), that is radioactive, or

(e) a product, material or substance packaged as a consumer product and in quantities normally used by the consuming public.

(3) The provisions do not apply if the controlled product is

(a) wood or a product made of wood,

(b) tobacco or a product made of tobacco,

(c) a manufactured article, or

(d) being transported or handled pursuant to the requirements of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act, 1992 (Canada) or the Transport of Dangerous Goods Act.

(4) The provisions do not apply to a hazardous waste, except that the employer must ensure the safe storage and handling of a hazardous waste generated at the workplace through the combination of worker education and the information required by this Regulation.

[am. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. C, s. 1.]

 Section 5.4 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Prohibition

5.4   (1) An employer must ensure that a controlled product is not used, stored or handled in a workplace unless all the applicable WHMIS Requirements concerning labels, identifiers, MSDSs and worker education and training are complied with, except as provided in subsection (2).

(2) An employer may store a controlled product in a workplace while actively seeking information required by subsection (1).

 Section 5.5 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

WHMIS program

5.5   If controlled products are used in the workplace the employer, in consultation with the joint committee or health and safety representative, as applicable, must establish and maintain an effective WHMIS program, as part of the overall workplace health and safety program, which

(a) addresses applicable WHMIS Requirements including education and training, and

(b) is reviewed at least annually, or more frequently if required by a change in work conditions or available hazard information.

 Section 5.6 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Worker education

5.6   (1) An employer must ensure that general WHMIS education, as it pertains to the workplace, is provided to workers on the

(a) elements of the WHMIS program,

(b) major hazards of the controlled products in use in the workplace,

(c) rights and responsibilities of employers and workers, and

(d) content required on labels and MSDSs, and the significance of this information.

(2) The employer must ensure that a worker who works with or in proximity to a controlled product received from a supplier has access to all hazard information received from the supplier concerning that controlled product as well as any further hazard information of which the employer is aware or ought to be aware concerning the use, storage and handling of that product.

(3) If a controlled product is produced in a workplace, the employer must ensure that a worker who works with or in proximity to that controlled product has access to all hazard information of which the employer is aware or ought to be aware concerning that product and its use, storage and handling.

 Section 5.7 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

(1) An employer must ensure that a worker who works with or in proximity to a controlled product is instructed in

(a) procedures for the safe use, storage, handling and disposal of the controlled product,

(b) the safe use, storage, handling and disposal of a controlled product contained or transferred in

(i) a pipe or a piping system including valves,

(ii) a process or reaction vessel, or

(iii) a tank car, tank truck, ore car, conveyor belt or similar conveyance,

(c) procedures to be followed if the controlled product escapes from equipment, or from another product, and

(d) procedures to be followed in case of an emergency involving a controlled product.

 Section 5.8 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Supplier label

5.8   (1) An employer must ensure that the container of a controlled product or a controlled product received at a workplace is labelled with a supplier label.

(2) Subject to sections 5.8 (3) and 5.18, as long as any amount of a controlled product remains in a workplace in the container in which it was received from the supplier, an employer must not remove, deface, modify or alter the supplier label.

(3) If a label applied to a controlled product or a container of a controlled product becomes illegible or is accidentally removed from the controlled product or the container, the employer must replace the label with either a supplier label or a workplace label.

(4) An employer who has received a controlled product in a multicontainer shipment where the individual containers have not been labelled by the supplier must apply to each container a label that meets the requirements of the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada).

(5) If a controlled product imported under section 23 of the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada) is received at the workplace without the supplier label, the employer must apply a label that meets the requirements of that regulation.

(6) An employer who has received a controlled product transported as a bulk shipment must

(a) apply a supplier label to the container of the controlled product or to the controlled product at the workplace, or

(b) where, pursuant to section 15 of the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada) the supplier is not required to label a controlled product transported as a bulk shipment, an employer must apply a workplace label to the container of the controlled product or to the controlled product at the workplace.

 Section 5.9 (1), (2) and (3) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

(1) If an employer produces a controlled product at a workplace, the employer must ensure that a workplace label is applied to the controlled product or the container of the controlled product.

(2) For purposes of subsection (1), "produces" does not include the escape of a controlled product from equipment or from another product.

(3) Subsection (1) does not apply when the controlled product is in a container that is intended to contain the controlled product for sale or distribution and the container is or is about to be appropriately labelled.

 Section 5.9 (4) was added by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

 Section 5.10 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Workplace label for decanted products

5.10   (1) If a controlled product in a workplace is in a container other than the container in which it was received from a supplier, the employer must ensure that the container has a workplace label applied to it.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a portable container that is filled directly from a container that has a supplier label or workplace label applied to it

(a) if the controlled product

(i) is under the control of and is used exclusively by the worker who filled the portable container,

(ii) is used only during the shift in which the portable container was filled, and

(iii) the content of the container is clearly identified, or

(b) if all of the controlled product is required for immediate use.

 Section 5.11 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Piping systems and vessels

5.11   If a controlled product in a workplace is contained or transferred in

(a) a pipe, or piping system including valves,

(b) a process or reaction vessel, or

(c) a tank car, tank truck, ore car, conveyor belt or similar conveyance,

the employer must ensure the safe use, storage and handling of the controlled product through worker education and the use of labels, placards, or colour coding or any other mode of identification.

 Section 5.12 (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Placard identifiers

5.12   If the controlled product is not in a container or is in a container in a form intended for export, the employer may fulfill the labelling requirements under sections 5.8 to 5.10 by posting a placard which

 Section 5.13 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Laboratory label

5.13   (1) A label for a container of a controlled product that originates from a laboratory supply house and is packaged in quantities of less than 10 kg (22 lbs) for each container and that is intended for use in a laboratory must disclose

(a) a product identifier,

(b) where an MSDS is available, a statement indicating that fact, and

(c) the risk phrases, precautionary measures, and first aid measures applicable to the product.

(2) The employer must ensure that the contents of a container of a controlled product are clearly identified on the container if

(a) the container is not the container in which the controlled product was received from the supplier, and

(b) the employer intends to use the controlled product, or it is, in the normal course of business, used, exclusively in a laboratory.

(3) The employer must ensure that a controlled product undergoing analysis, tests or evaluations in a laboratory is clearly identified.

 Section 5.14 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Supplier MSDS

5.14   (1) An employer who acquires a controlled product for use at a workplace must obtain a supplier MSDS for that controlled product if the supplier is required to prepare an MSDS.

(2) When a supplier MSDS obtained under subsection (1) for a controlled product is 3 years old, the employer must, if possible, obtain from the supplier an up-to-date supplier MSDS for the controlled product if any of the product remains in the workplace.

(3) If the employer is unable to obtain an MSDS as required by subsection (2), the employer must add to the existing supplier MSDS any new hazard information of which the employer is aware or ought reasonably to be aware, applicable to that controlled product on the basis of the ingredients disclosed in that document.

(4) The employer may provide at a workplace an MSDS in a format different from the format provided by the supplier or containing additional hazard information if the MSDS provided by the employer

(a) subject to section 5.18, contains at least the content of the supplier MSDS, and

(b) the supplier MSDS is available at the workplace and the MSDS provided by the employer indicates that fact.

 Section 5.15 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Employer MSDS

5.15   (1) If an employer produces a controlled product in the workplace, the employer must prepare an MSDS for the product which discloses, subject to section 5.18, the information required under the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada).

(2) For the purpose of subsection (1), "produces" does not include the escape of a controlled product from equipment or from another product nor does it include intermediate products undergoing reaction within a reaction or process vessel.

(3) The employer must update the MSDS referred to in subsection (1)

(a) as soon as practicable after new hazard information becomes available to the employer, and

(b) at least every 3 years.

 Section 5.16 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Availability of an MSDS

5.16   (1) An employer must ensure that a copy of an MSDS required by sections 5.14 or 5.15 is made readily available

(a) at the workplace to workers who may be exposed to the controlled product, and

(b) to the joint committee or to the worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

(2) If an employer is required by subsection (1) to make an MSDS readily available, it may be made available on a computer system if the employer

(a) takes all reasonable steps to keep the system in active working order,

(b) makes the MSDS readily available on the request of a worker, and

(c) provides training in accessing computer-stored MSDS to

(i) one or more workers working at a workplace where the MSDS is available on a computer terminal, and

(ii) members of the joint committee or the worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 33.]

 Section 5.16.1 was enacted by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

 Section 5.17 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Deletions from an MSDS

5.17   If an employer claims an exemption under section 5.18, the employer may delete the information that is the subject of the claim from the MSDS required by sections 5.14 and 5.15 for the time period in section 5.19 (2), but may not delete hazard information.

 Section 5.18 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Confidential business information

5.18   If, under the WHMIS Requirements, an employer must disclose on a label or an MSDS

(a) the chemical identity or concentration of an ingredient of a controlled product,

(b) the name of any toxicological study that identifies an ingredient of a controlled product,

(c) the chemical name, common name, generic name, trade name or brand name of a controlled product, or

(d) information that could be used to identify a supplier of a controlled product,

the employer may consider such information to be confidential business information and claim an exemption from the requirement to disclose that information.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 35.]

 Section 5.19 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Claims under the HMIR Act

5.19   (1) A claim under section 5.18 must be made to the commission established under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (Canada) and must be filed in accordance with the procedures established under that Act and the regulations made under it.

(2) Information that an employer considers to be confidential business information is exempt from disclosure from the time a claim is filed under section 5.18 until the claim is finally determined by the commission and for a period of 3 years after that if the claim is found to be valid.

(3) An employer who makes a claim under section 5.18 must abide by the decisions and orders of the commission.

(4) An appeal from a decision made by the commission under this section may be made under and in accordance with the provisions of the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (Canada) and any regulations made under that Act.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, ss. 34 and 35.]

 Section 5.27 (0.1) was added by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

 Section 5.27 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1) sources of ignition include open flame, spark-producing mechanical equipment, welding and cutting processes, smoking, static discharge and any electrical equipment or installation that is not approved for hazardous locations, as specified by the Electrical Safety Act.

 Section 5.27 (0.1) BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(0.1) In this section, "B.C. Electrical Code" has the same meaning as in the Electrical Safety Regulation.

 Section 5.27 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(2) For the purposes of subsection (1) sources of ignition include open flame, spark-producing mechanical equipment, welding and cutting processes, smoking, static discharge and any electrical equipment or installation that is not approved in the B.C. Electrical Code for use in hazardous locations.

 Section 5.27 (3) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(3) If the work involves more than one employer, the principal contractor or, if there is no principal contractor, the owner must ensure that sources of ignition resulting from the work of one employer are eliminated or adequately controlled in any work area where a flammable gas or a flammable liquid is handled, used or stored by any other employer.

 Section 5.50 (2) BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 188/2011 effective February 1, 2012.

(2)  For some substances with an extended biological half-life, with written permission from the Board, a factor other than those in subsection (1), or a time-weighted averaging period other than 8 hours may be used to accommodate extended work periods, provided that any such adjustment is based upon recognized occupational hygiene principles, and provides adequate protection from adverse health effects.

 Section 5.71 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(2) Electrical components of an exhaust ventilation system required by subsection (1) must comply with Class I Division I requirements of CSA Standard C22.1-94, Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1 if the components contact the air stream.

 Section 5.76 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Label

5.76   If an employer produces, stores, handles or disposes of a hazardous waste at a workplace, the employer must, except as provided in section 5.79, ensure that a workplace label is applied to each container of hazardous waste, or the information mandated by the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada) is provided, if applicable.

 Section 5.77 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

(2) If a fugitive emission that contains a controlled product is produced or disposed of, the employer must post a placard which complies with subsection (1), or ensure equivalent information is provided to workers through identification and training.

 Section 5.78 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

MSDS

5.78   If a hazardous waste or a fugitive emission that contains a controlled product is produced, stored, handled or disposed of in the workplace, the employer must prepare an MSDS for the hazardous waste or fugitive emission unless a hazardous waste profile sheet or its equivalent which addresses composition, hazards and safe measures for the waste or fugitive emission is readily available.

 Section 5.79 (b) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

(b) at the time of sale or disposal the employer transmits to the receiver an MSDS for the controlled products in the hazardous waste or a hazardous waste profile sheet which addresses the composition, hazards and safe measures for the hazardous waste.

 Table 5-2 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Table 5-2: Risk assessment

Risk LevelDescription of the workplaceExamples
High riskWorkplaces at which corrosive chemicals or other materials are used in a manner, concentration and quantity which present a risk of irreversible tissue damage to the eyes or skin, or of serious illness resulting from rapid absorption of a toxic substance through the eyes or skin, or where the work activity presents a risk of ignition of the clothing.Maintenance of ammonia refrigeration equipment or chlorine bleaching or disinfection equipment, handling corrosive (WHMIS Class E) materials such as corrosive cleaning products or chemical reagents where there is a high risk of skin or eye contact, filling chemical storage batteries.
Moderate riskWorkplaces at which chemicals or other materials are used in a manner, concentration and quantity which present a risk of irritation or other reversible harm to the eyes or skin, or of illness resulting from absorption of a toxic substance through the eyes or skin.Spraying automotive paints and finishes, operating solvent degreasing equipment, handling irritant materials (irritants classified as WHMIS Class D2B) such as cleaning products or chemical reagents where there is a moderate risk of skin or eye contact, handling dry-cleaning solvents and spotting agents.
Low riskWorkplaces at which chemicals or other materials are used in a manner and quantity which present a risk of mild eye or skin irritation.Using detergents, silicone-based mold-release agents, some hair-dressing solutions, rosin-cored solders, welding and grinding, working in dusty areas.

 Section 5.98 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Inventory

5.98   (1) An inventory must be maintained which identifies all hazardous substances at the workplace in quantities that may endanger workers in an emergency including controlled products covered by WHMIS, explosives, pesticides, radioactive materials, hazardous wastes, and consumer products.

(2) The inventory must identify the nature, location, and approximate quantity of all such substances, and the location of MSDSs.

 Section 6.1 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Definitions

6.1  In sections 6.2 to 6.32:

"asbestos-containing material" means any manufactured article or other material which contains 1% or more asbestos by weight at the time of manufacture, or which contains 1% or more asbestos as determined in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Manual of Analytical Methods, Method 9002, Issue 2 (microscopy, stereo and polarized light, with dispersion staining) or other method acceptable to the Board;

"clean room" means a room in a high risk decontamination facility which is used by workers to change from street clothes into protective work clothing and equipment prior to entering the designated work area;

"clearance air sampling" means sampling to determine if the air inside a containment of a high risk work activity is sufficiently free of asbestos fibre to permit the dismantling of the containment;

"containment" means an isolation system designed to effectively contain asbestos fibre within a designated work area where asbestos-containing material is handled, removed, encapsulated or enclosed, and includes a glove bag;

"decontamination facility" means a series of rooms constructed so as to allow a person to enter and leave a containment without spreading asbestos fibre or waste material beyond the designated work area;

"designated work area" means an area for work with asbestos-containing material which is restricted to access by authorized persons by warning signs and by barricades, enclosures or other means of isolation, with due regard for the level of risk;

"encapsulation" means treatment of an asbestos-containing material or surface with a sealant which penetrates the material and binds the fibres together;

"enclosure" means isolation of asbestos-containing material from adjacent occupied areas in a building by physical barriers such as gyproc, plywood, or metal sheeting, to prevent the release of airborne asbestos fibres into these areas;

"friable material" means any material which, when dry, can be easily crumbled or powdered by hand pressure, or a material that is crumbled or powdered;

"high risk work activity" means work activity involving the handling of asbestos-containing material or working in proximity to friable asbestos-containing material, where there is a high level of control necessary to prevent exposure to excessive concentrations of airborne asbestos fibre;

"low risk work activity" means work activity in proximity to friable asbestos-containing material, where the material is not disturbed and there is no significant release of asbestos fibre;

"moderate risk work activity" means work activity involving the handling of asbestos-containing material or working in proximity to friable asbestos-containing material, not otherwise classified as low or high risk work activities.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. A, s. 7; 19/2006, s. 2.]

 Section 6.2 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Application

6.2  Sections 6.3 to 6.32 apply to a workplace where a worker is or may be exposed to potentially hazardous levels of asbestos fibre, including

(a) a workplace where asbestos-containing materials is present or is used,

(b) operations involving the abatement of asbestos-containing material, and

(c) an operation in which exposure to asbestos fibre, in excess of 50% of the exposure limits, may occur.

 Section 6.4 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Inventory

6.4  The employer must ensure that an inventory of all asbestos-containing materials present in the workplace is prepared and kept current.

 Section 6.4 (1) (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(1) The employer must ensure that a qualified person

 Section 6.4 (1) (c) was added by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.4 (2) and (3) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(2) If a qualified person suspects that an inaccessible material contains asbestos, the material must be treated as asbestos-containing material unless a qualified person determines, in accordance with subsection (1) (b), that it is not asbestos-containing material.

(3) The employer must

(a) ensure that a qualified person prepares an inventory of all asbestos-containing materials in the workplace,

(b) keep the inventory at the workplace, and

(c) keep the inventory current.

 Section 6.4 (4), (5), (6) and (7) were added by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.5 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Identification

6.5   The employer must ensure that all asbestos-containing materials present in the workplace are identified by signs, labels or when these are not practicable, other effective means.

 Section 6.6 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Assessment and classification

6.6  (1)  The employer must ensure that a risk assessment is conducted by a qualified person on asbestos-containing material identified in the inventory, with due regard for the condition of the material, its friability, accessibility and likelihood of damage, and the potential for fibre release and exposure of workers.

(2)  The employer must ensure that a risk assessment has been conducted before any demolition, alteration, or repair of machinery, equipment, or structures where asbestos may be disturbed.

(3)  Before work involving asbestos takes place the employer must ensure that a qualified person assesses the work activity and classifies it as a low, moderate, or high risk activity.

(4)  The qualified person referenced in subsections (1) and (3) must be an occupational health and safety professional with experience in the practice of occupational hygiene as it relates to asbestos management.

 Section 6.6 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(1) The employer must ensure that a risk assessment is conducted by a qualified person on asbestos-containing material identified in the inventory referred to in section 6.4 (3), with due regard for the condition of the material, its friability, accessibility and likelihood of damage, and the potential for fibre release and exposure of workers.

 Section 6.7 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011 effective February 1, 2012.

 Control of friable asbestos

6.7  (1)  The employer must ensure that a friable asbestos-containing material in the workplace is controlled by removal, enclosure or encapsulation so as to prevent the release of airborne asbestos fibre.

(2)  The employer must not allow any work that would disturb friable asbestos-containing material unless necessary precautions have been taken to protect workers.

 Section 6.9 (4) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(4)  The employer must not permit the use of compressed air to clean up or remove asbestos-containing dust or debris, or dry sweeping or dry mopping of asbestos-containing waste.

 Section 6.10 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(1)  The employer must substitute material less hazardous than asbestos when practicable.

 Section 6.12 (3) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(3)  The employer must make the results of all air samples taken during a high risk activity available to the workers involved, within 24 hours of completing the collection of the samples.

 Section 6.16 (4) and (5) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(4)  If the high risk activity involves encapsulation of asbestos-containing material, the employer must ensure that the encapsulant penetrates the material and effectively binds the asbestos fibres together, and has not disturbed the bonding of the material to the supporting surface.

(5)  At the completion of a high risk activity and before dismantling the containment, the employer must

(a) visually inspect the area inside the containment to ensure that an effective cleanup has been completed, and

(b) treat all exposed surfaces inside the containment with a sealant to bind any remaining asbestos fibres and prevent them from becoming airborne.

 Section 6.18 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Local exhaust ventilation

6.18  The employer must provide local exhaust ventilation with exhaust air discharged through a HEPA filter for all dust-producing operations outside a containment where asbestos or asbestos-containing dust is handled or used.

 Section 6.20 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(1)  Before starting work where exposed, friable asbestos-containing material is present or asbestos-containing material has been handled, the employer must remove all asbestos dust from contaminated work surfaces with a damp cloth or similar material, or with a vacuum cleaner equipped with a HEPA-filtered exhaust.

 Section 6.24 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Friction materials

6.24  If automotive service procedures may involve asbestos-containing friction material or dust arising from such material, the employer must ensure that the following control measures are implemented:

(a) dry removal of friction material dust from automotive assemblies using compressed air, brushes, or other similar means is prohibited;

(b) service work areas where friction material is handled are posted with signs to advise workers of the hazards and required precautions;

(c) suitable work procedures are followed to minimize the generation of airborne dust;

(d) a worker handling equipment or assemblies contaminated with dust from friction material, outside of a HEPA-filtered vacuum enclosure system, wears suitable personal protective equipment, including disposable coveralls and at least a HEPA-filtered dual cartridge half face respirator;

(e) waste material that may be contaminated with asbestos is promptly collected and disposed of in accordance with applicable requirements;

(f) contaminated tools, equipment and work surfaces are cleaned after work is completed.

 Section 6.27 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Waste removal

6.27  The employer must remove all asbestos dust and debris from the work area with a vacuum cleaner equipped with a HEPA-filtered exhaust, or by other means acceptable to the Board, while the work is in progress, at the end of each work shift, and at the completion of work involving asbestos.

[am. B.C. Reg. 253/2001, s. 3.]

 Section 6.29 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(1)  The employer must supply, and ensure that workers within a designated work area wear, respiratory protection which is adequate for the anticipated level of exposure.

 Section 6.32 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(2)  The employer must maintain for at least 3 years, records of corrective actions to control fibre release, training and instruction of workers, written work procedures and written notification of the Board.

 Section 6.32 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Types of records

6.32   (1) The employer must maintain, for at least 10 years, records of asbestos-containing materials inventories and risk assessments, inspections and air monitoring results.

(2) The employer must maintain, for at least 3 years, records of corrective actions to control asbestos fibre release, training and instruction of workers, written work procedures and written notification of the Board.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 12.]

 Section 6.34 (d) (iii) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(iii)  work procedures to ensure that laboratory or other samples containing a biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1 are handled in accordance with the Laboratory Biosafety Manual issued by the World Health Organization, as amended from time to time, and the Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines issued by Health Canada, as amended from time to time;

 Section 6.37 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

(1) A container holding a known or suspected biological agent designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1 must be clearly identified by the biohazard symbol as described in the Controlled Products Regulations (Canada) or by other means that indicates the presence of a biological agent.

 Section 6.58.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.59 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Application

6.59   Sections 6.60 to 6.69 apply to any workplace where a worker is or may be exposed to potentially hazardous levels of inorganic lead.

 Section 6.59.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.60 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Exposure control plan

6.60   The employer must develop and implement an exposure control plan meeting the requirements of section 5.54 if workers are or may be exposed to lead in excess of 50% of the exposure limits, or if exposure through any route of entry could result in elevated lead body-burdens, as defined by the Board.

 Section 6.60.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.61 (b) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(b) as necessary throughout the project to ensure that controls are effective and respiratory protection is adequate.

 Section 6.61 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Air monitoring in construction projects

6.61   If there is a potential for hazardous exposure to airborne lead in a construction project, the employer must ensure that air monitoring is conducted

(a) during the first shift of the construction project involving lead, and

(b) as necessary throughout the project to ensure that controls are effective and respirators are adequate.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. G, s. 3.]

 Section 6.61.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.62 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Warning signs

6.62   Warning signs must be posted at the boundary of any work area where hazardous lead exposures could occur.

 Section 6.63 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Personal hygiene

6.63   If exposure to finely divided lead or lead compounds results in the contamination of exposed skin or work clothing, the requirements for personal hygiene in Part 5 [Chemical Agents and Biological Agents] must be met.

 Section 6.64 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Work surfaces

6.64   All surfaces in the work area must be kept as free as practicable from accumulations of lead dust.

 Section 6.65 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Lead removal

6.65   Removal of lead dust must be done by a means which prevents the dispersal of finely divided lead into any work area.

 Section 6.66 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Instruction and training

6.66   The employer must ensure that a worker who is at risk of exposure to lead is adequately instructed and trained in

(a) the hazards of lead,

(b) the written work procedures to be followed,

(c) the correct operation and use of any required engineering controls and personal protective equipment,

(d) personal hygiene and decontamination procedures, and

(e) the purpose and significance of any health monitoring.

 Section 6.75 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

MSDS

6.75   The employer must make readily available to workers an MSDS or its written equivalent for all pesticides used at the workplace.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 45.]

 Section 6.77 (1) (b) and (3) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(b) holds a valid applicator certificate issued pursuant to the Pesticide Control Act and Regulation.

(3)  Workers involved in training for the purposes of obtaining a valid applicator certificate who are directly supervised by a qualified person are exempt from the requirement of subsection (1) (b) during the training period.

 Section 6.108 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

Records

6.108   The employer must keep records and MSDSs on all previously used antisapstain materials if a change of chemical has occurred and the equipment or work areas have not been adequately decontaminated, and this information must be readily available to workers.

 Heading above Section 6.110 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Rock Dust

 Section 6.110 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Application

6.110   Sections 6.110 to 6.115 apply to rock crushing, drilling, mucking, excavation, loading, transportation, road grading, road construction or conveying of rock or similar operations.

 Section 6.111 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Dust control

6.111   (1) The employer must ensure that dust concentrations to which a worker may be exposed are maintained at or below the established exposure limits, by one or a combination of

(a) mechanical ventilation,

(b) the use of water spray,

(c) other equally effective methods.

(2) When practicable, ventilation systems for removing dust must be equipped with effective filtration.

 Section 6.112 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Restricted access

6.112   The employer must ensure that only those properly protected workers who are necessary to perform the work are permitted in a dust hazard area.

 Section 6.112.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.112.2 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.112.3 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.112.4 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.112.5 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.112.6 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.112.7 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.114 (part) and (a) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Rock crushing plants

6.114   Rock crushing plants must be equipped with the following dust controls:

(a) rock crushers, including jaw, roll, cone, or hammer-mills must have an effective mechanical exhaust system;

 Section 6.115.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 6.116, definition of "toxic process gas", paragraph (a) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

(a) meets the WHMIS toxicity classification criteria for a class D Division 1 Subdivision A (very toxic acute health effect materials) or a class D Division 2 (very toxic and toxic chronic health effect materials) controlled product, and

 Section 6.127 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(2)  A worker performing a hazardous work procedure on equipment or machinery where there is the risk of toxic process gas being released directly into the breathing zone, such as cylinder changing, system or line purging or draining, and leak detection and repair, must wear appropriate respiratory protection.

 Section 6.128 (3) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(3)  Monitoring and alarm systems must be

(a) tested at least monthly for proper operation, and

(b) calibrated at least annually,

by authorized personnel using procedures acceptable to the Board.

 Section 8.1 was renumbered to 8.1(1) by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 8.1 (2) was added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 8.5 (d) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(d) for respiratory equipment, medical assessment of respirator wearers, when required,

 Section 8.6 (2) (d) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(d) for respiratory protection, assess the adequacy of exposure monitoring data and assess the need for further monitoring, and ensure the adequacy of the fit test program.

 Section 8.21 (1) to (3) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(1)  Leg protective devices must be worn by a worker operating a chain saw if there is a danger of leg injury.

(2)  Leg protective devices must meet the requirements of WCB Standard, PPE 1-1997 Leg Protective Devices.

(3)  Every leg protective device must have a label permanently affixed to the outer surface of the device indicating the standard it meets.

 Section 8.32 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 When required

8.32  The employer must provide appropriate respiratory protective equipment if a worker is or may be exposed to concentrations of an air contaminant in excess of an applicable exposure or excursion limit, or to an oxygen deficient atmosphere.

 Section 8.33 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(1)  The employer, in consultation with the worker and the occupational health and safety committee, if any, or the worker health and safety representative, if any, must select appropriate respiratory protective equipment in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.4-93, Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators.

(2)  Only respiratory protective equipment which meets the requirements of a standard acceptable to the Board may be used for protection against airborne contaminants in the workplace.

 Section 8.34 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Protection factors

8.34  A respirator must not be used for protection against concentrations of an air contaminant greater than the maximum use concentration, which is the concentration determined by multiplying the exposure limit for the air contaminant by the appropriate respirator protection factor selected from Table 8-1, or as otherwise determined by the Board.

Table 8-1: Respirator protection factors
Respirator typeProtection
factor
Air purifying
Half facepiece, non-powered10
Full facepiece, non-powered50
Full facepiece, powered (PAPR), equipped with
HEPA filters for exposure to asbestos
100
Full facepiece, powered (PAPR), equipped with
HEPA filters and/or sorbent cartridge or canister for exposure
to contaminants other than asbestos
1 000
Loose-fitting facepiece, powered (PAPR)25
Air supplying
Airline - demand (negative pressure)
Half facepiece10
Full facepiece50
Airline - continuous flow
Loose-fitting facepiece/hoods25
Half facepiece50
Full facepiece1 000
Helmet/hood1 000
Airline - pressure demand (positive pressure)
Half facepiece50
Full facepiece1 000
Full facepiece, with egress bottle10 000
Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)
Demand (negative pressure)50
Pressure demand (positive pressure)10 000
Other factors such as warning properties, IDLH levels, and cartridge/canister limitations
must also be taken into account when determining the maximum use concentration.
Refer to the manufacturer's instructions and standards acceptable to the Board for further information.

[am. B.C. Reg. 20/2006, s. 2.]

 Part 8 schedule 8-A was added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 8.11 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(2) Safety headgear must meet the requirements of

(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.1-92, Industrial Protective Headwear,

(b) ANSI Standard Z89.1-1986, American National Standard for Personnel Protection — Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers Requirements, or

(c) Japanese Industrial Standard JIS T8131-1990, Industrial Safety Helmets, for Class AB or ABE headgear.

(d) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 8 (b).]

 Sections 8.14 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Safety eyewear

8.14   (1) A worker must wear properly fitting safety eyewear appropriate to the conditions of the workplace if handling or exposed to materials which are likely to injure or irritate the eyes.

(2) Properly fitting safety eyewear appropriate to the conditions of the workplace must be worn if a worker

(a) has 20/200 or less vision in either eye, or is blind in either eye, or

(b) is working on or testing electrical equipment energized at a potential greater than 30 volts.

 Sections 8.15 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Prescription safety eyewear

8.15   (1) Prescription safety eyewear must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.3-92, Industrial Eye and Face Protectors.

(2) Bifocal and trifocal glass lenses must not be used if there is danger of impact unless they are worn behind impact rated goggles or other eye protection acceptable to the Board.

(3) If the use of polycarbonate or plastic prescription lenses is impracticable, due to the conditions of the workplace, and there is no danger of impact, workers may use prescription lenses made of treated safety glass meeting the requirements of ANSI Standard Z87.1-1989, Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

 Sections 8.16 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Sideshields

8.16   Safety eyewear must be fitted with sideshields when necessary for the safety of a worker.

 Sections 8.17 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Face protection

8.17   (1) If there is a risk of face injury, suitable face protection must be worn.

(2) Face protectors and non prescription safety eyewear must meet the requirements of

(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.3-92, Industrial Eye and Face Protectors, or

(b) ANSI Standard Z87.1-1989, Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection.

(c) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 11 (c).]

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 11.]

 Sections 8.18 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Contact lenses

8.18   Adequate precautions must be taken if a hazardous substance or condition may adversely affect a worker wearing contact lenses.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 51.]

 Section 8.29 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Automatically inflatable lifejackets

8.29   If automatically inflatable lifejackets are used, the employer must keep a record of all inspections made and maintenance performed on them.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 11.]

 Section 9.1, definition of "harmful substance" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

"harmful substance" means a WHMIS controlled product, a substance referred to under section 5.48, or a substance which may have a harmful effect on a worker in a confined space;

 Section 9.18 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Isolation

9.18  (1)  Except as provided in subsection (2), before a worker enters a confined space, adjacent piping which contains or has contained a harmful substance must be controlled by

(a) disconnecting, blanking or blinding, or equivalent engineered system, or

(b) if the adjacent piping contains a harmful substance that is not a gas or a vapour, nor a liquid of sufficient volatility to produce a hazardous concentration of an air contaminant in the discharge of the piping, a double block and bleed system.

(2)  If adjacent piping contains or has contained a substance that is hazardous only because of its pressure, temperature or quantity, before a worker enters the space, the pressure must be controlled

(a) to meet the requirements of subsection (1),

(b) provided there is no other pressure source or head pressure, by de-energizing and locking out the pressure source and depressurizing the line, or

(c) by other effective means.

(3)  Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 243/2006, s. 4 (d).]

(4)  Except when used in an acceptable double block and bleed system, the closing of one or more valves in a line is not an acceptable means of isolation.

(5)  Isolation of a confined space from gases found in a gravity-flow municipal or domestic sanitary or storm sewer system may be accomplished by a p-trap, provided that

(a) the integrity of the trap is ensured immediately upon entry, and

(b) the atmosphere is continuously monitored and shown to contain clean respirable air.

[am. B.C. Reg. 243/2006, s. 4.]

 Section 9.18.1 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Exemptions

9.18.1  (1)  In this section:

"public water supply system" includes valve and meter chambers and pressure reducing stations;

"dam water passageway" includes conduits, pipes, penstocks, power generating chambers, valves and related structures located within storage, diversion or other dams.

(2)  Section 9.18 (4) does not apply to water piping that is part of a public water supply system if the piping and associated equipment is designed, constructed, maintained and certified by a professional engineer to American Water Works Association standards.

(3)  Section 9.18 (4) does not apply to a dam water passageway if the structures of the passageway, including a gate valve or other flow control device, are certified by a professional engineer as being safe for workers to enter to perform the intended work.

[en. B.C. Reg. 320/2007, App. B.]

 Section 9.22 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(1)  If isolation using the measures specified in section 9.18 is not practicable, the employer may implement alternate measures acceptable to the Board.

 Section 9.25 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(1)  Except as stated in subsection (7), before a worker enters a confined space, the employer must ensure that the atmosphere in the confined space is tested.

 Section 9.26 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(2)  Each confined space test must be carried out by an adequately trained worker.

 Section 9.29 (3) (b) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(b) every worker entering the confined space must be equipped with supplied-air respiratory protection meeting the requirements of Part 8 (Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment),

 Section 11.1 definitions of "anchor" and "personal fall protection system" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 404/2012, effective April 1, 2013.

"anchor" means a secure point of attachment for a lifeline or lanyard;

"personal fall protection system" means a worker's fall restraint system or fall arrest system composed of

(a) a safety belt or full body harness, and

(b) a lanyard, lifeline and any other connecting equipment individual to the worker

that is used to secure the worker to an individual point of anchorage or to a horizontal lifeline system;

 Section 11.1 definition of "anchorage" was addded by BC Reg 404/2012, effective April 1, 2013.

 Section 11.2 (4) and (5) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

(4) If subsection (3) is not practicable, the employer must ensure that a fall arrest system is used.

(5) If the use of a fall arrest system is not practicable, or will result in a hazard greater than if the system was not used, the employer must ensure that work procedures are followed that are acceptable to the Board and minimize the risk of injury to a worker from a fall.

 Section 11.6 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 404/2012, effective April 1, 2013 1, 2013.

(2)  Each personal fall protection system that is connected to an anchor must be secured to an independent point of anchorage.

 Section 11.10 (0.1) was added by BC Reg 404/2012, effective April 1, 2013.

 Section 12.14 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 30/2015, effective August 4, 2015.

(2) A piping system containing substances other than controlled products must be identified in a manner known to the affected workers.

 Section 12.60 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

 Kickback fingers, splitters and spreaders

12.60  (1)  Except as provided in subsection (2), a hand-fed circular saw with rip-type teeth must have kickback fingers and a splitter or spreader designed to prevent kickback.

(2)  Kickback fingers, splitters or spreaders are not required when grooving, dadoing or rabbeting.

 Section 12.70 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Driven-feed chippers

12.70  A driven-feed chipper must have a guard chute or apron extending at least 90 cm (3 ft) from the feed rollers and a panic bar to stop the feed rollers.

 Section 12.80.2 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Swing-arm restraint

12.80.2  (1)  If an automotive lift has swing arms, a swing-arm pivot restraint system must be used.

(2)  The swing-arm pivot restraint system must incorporate a means to prevent unintentional removal or disengagement.

[en. B.C. Reg. 17/2006, s. 7.]

 Section 12.83.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 12.111 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(2)  Unless the process is isolated from the operator in a separate cabinet, suitable respiratory protective equipment must be provided and worn whenever abrasive blasting or a similar operation is conducted.

 Section 12.124 (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

12.124  Respiratory protective equipment must be provided and worn if an effective means of natural, mechanical or local exhaust ventilation is not practicable

 Section 12.135 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

12.135  Each worker who is or may be exposed to an airborne contaminant generated by a spray operation involving a sensitizing agent referred to in section 5.57 (1) must be provided with and wear air-supplied respiratory protection.

 Sections 12.173 and 12.174 were enacted by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

 Sections 12.175 to 12.183 were enacted by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

 Section 13.5 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

Position and stability

13.5   A ladder must

(a) be placed on a firm and level base,

(b) be positioned so that the horizontal distance from the base to vertical plane of support is approximately ¼ of the ladder length,

(c) have sufficient length to project approximately 1 m (3 ft) above the upper landing to which it provides access, and

(d) if necessary, be secured to ensure stability during use.

[en. B.C. Reg. 422/2004, s. 1.]

 Section 13.11 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(1) A scaffold must be constructed, installed and used in accordance with the instructions of a professional engineer with respect to

(a) bracing, if the scaffold is enclosed by a tarpaulin or any other cover,

(b) a scaffold exceeding 38 m (125 ft) in height,

(c) a scaffold exceeding 25 m (80 ft) in height if stairways are included as part of the scaffold,

(d) a scaffold used to support a temporary floor,

(e) a scaffold suspended or cantilevered from a structure,

(f) a scaffold system supported by a catenary line,

(g) a needle beam scaffold, and

(h) an outrigger scaffold.

 Section 13.20 (1) (c) BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

(c) a work platform that is supported by a lift truck;

 Section 13.23 (2) to (4) BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

(2)  An insulated elevating work platform must be dielectrically tested at least annually in accordance with the edition of CSA Standard CAN/CSA-C225 Vehicle-Mounted Aerial Devices that the device was designed to meet, or the most recent edition, as the circumstances require.

(3)  The insulating capability of an insulated elevating work platform must be certified by the testing agency.

(4)  If an insulated elevating work platform does not pass the testing method required by subsection (2) and subsection (3),

(a) the platform must be considered non-insulated,

(b) any markings or identification on the device indicating insulated capability must be removed or effectively covered over, and

(c) the user must be informed of the non-insulated status of the device.

 Section 13.30 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

 Lift truck (forklift) mounted work platforms

13.30  (1)  A work platform supported by a lift truck may be used to support people only if other conventional means of access for the task, such as ladders, scaffolds and elevating work platforms, are not practicable.

(2)  A work platform supported by a lift truck must be designed and used in accordance with WorkSafeBC Standard 13.30 Work Platforms supported by Lift Trucks.

[en. B.C. Reg. 320/2007, App. D, s. 2.]

 Section 13.32 (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

13.32  A swing stage, boatswain's chair and portable powered platform must not be used without prior permission of the Board if

 Section 13.32 (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

13.32   Before a swing stage, boatswain's chair or portable powered platform is used in any of the following circumstances, a professional engineer must have certified in writing that the design, installation and proposed use of the swing stage, boatswain's chair or portable powered platform, as the case may be, meets the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z271-98 (R2003) Safety Code for Suspended Elevating Platforms and CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z91-02 (R2008) Health and Safety Code for Suspended Equipment Operations:

 Section 14.1 definition of "miscellaneous material hoist" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 118/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

"miscellaneous material hoist" means a permanently installed material hoist not described elsewhere in this Regulation and not governed by the Elevating Devices Safety Act;

 Section 14.1 definitions of "miscellaneous material hoist" and "safe working load" BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

"miscellaneous material hoist" means a permanently installed material hoist not described elsewhere in this Regulation and not regulated under the Safety Standards Act;

"safe working load" means the load a crane or hoist may safely lift in a particular situation taking into account such factors as wind load, extremes of temperature and load sail area, and may be equal to or less than the rated capacity or rated load;

 Section 14.2 (9) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(9)  A chimney hoist must meet the requirements of WorkSafeBC Standard 14.116 Chimney Hoists.

 Section 14.2 (8) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(8) A construction material hoist must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z256-M87, Safety Code for Material Hoists.

 Section 14.5 (1) and (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(1) Subject to subsection (3), the rated capacity of a crane or hoist system must be permanently indicated on the superstructure, hoist and load block of the equipment.

(2) The rated capacity of a monorail crane must be permanently marked on the hoist and at intervals not exceeding 10 m (33 ft.) on the monorail beam.

 Section 14.11 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Support structure

14.11   (1) The rated capacity of a hoist must not exceed the capacity of the structure supporting the hoist.

(2) Selector switches or other effective means must be provided to ensure that the supporting structure is not overloaded by simultaneous use of multiple hoists installed on the supporting structure.

[am. B.C. Reg. 320/2007, App. E, s. 8.]

 Section 14.81 (0.1) was added by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 14.81 (2) and (3) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(2) Subject to subsection (4), limit devices on a tower crane must be tested before the crane is first used on each work shift.

(3) Any malfunction of an automatic limit or safety device on a tower crane must be remedied before the crane is used.

 Section 14.116 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Permission to use

14.116  If it is not practicable to provide safe access to a work platform on a chimney or similar structure using stairs or other means acceptable under the BC Building Code or this Regulation, a chimney hoist meeting the requirements of WorkSafeBC Standard 14.116 Chimney Hoists may, with the prior permission of the Board, be used to provide access for any person.

[en. B.C. Reg. 320/2007, App. E, s. 67.]

 Section 14.117 (1) (b) (iii) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(iii)  the requirements of WorkSafeBC Standard 14.116 Chimney Hoists, and

 Section 14.119 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Load rating

14.119  The rated capacity of a chimney hoist must be conspicuously marked on the platform or cage and must not be exceeded.

[am. B.C. Reg. 320/2007, App. E, s. 68.]

 Schedule 14-A was added by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Section 15.6, table 15-1 was added after (1) by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 15.9, table 15-1 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

Table 15-1: Design factors for rigging

ComponentDesign factor
Nylon fibre rope sling9
Polyester rope sling9
Polypropylene rope sling6
Alloy steel chain sling4
Wire rope sling5
Metal mesh sling5
Synthetic web sling5
Chain fittings4
Wire rope sling fittings5
Other fittingsas specified by manufacturer
Nonrotating wire ropeas specified by manufacturer but not less than 5
Conventional wire rope5

 Section 15.23 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Wire rope splices

15.23  Wire rope splices made using wire rope clips must

(a) use double the number of clips specified by the manufacturer or Table 15-2 for a single loop termination, when forming a lap splice, or

(b) use the number of clips specified by the manufacturer or Table 15-2 for each loop termination, when forming a double loop splice.

 Section 15.30 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

15.30  Unless otherwise required by this Regulation, wire rope, alloy steel chain, metal mesh, synthetic fibre rope and synthetic fibre web slings must meet the requirements of ASME B30.9-1990, Slings.

 Section 16.3 (7) and (8) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

(7)  In addition to complying with the applicable requirements in this Part, a class 7 variable reach lift truck must meet and be used in accordance with the requirements of sections 14.5, 14.7, 14.8, 14.12, 14.13, 14.15, 14.39, 14.43 and 14.69.

(8)  A record of inspections and maintenance meeting the requirements of section 4.9 must be kept by the operator of a class 7 variable reach lift truck and any other persons inspecting and maintaining that truck.

 Section 16.7 (a) and (c) to (g) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

(a) Articulating Boom Cranes: ANSI Standard ASME B30.22-1993, American National Standard for Articulating Boom Cranes;

(c) Mobile and Locomotive Cranes: CSA Standard Z150-1974, Safety Code for Mobile Cranes, or ANSI Standard ASME B30.5-1994, Mobile and Locomotive Cranes;

(d) Powered Industrial Trucks (low lift and high lift): ANSI Standard ASME B56.1-1993, Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks;

(e) Rough Terrain Forklifts: ANSI Standard ASME B56.6-1992, Safety Standard for Rough Terrain Forklift Trucks;

(f) Side Boom Tractors: ANSI Standard ASME B30.14-1991, Side Boom Tractors;

(g) Vehicles with Mounted Aerial Devices (except firefighting equipment): CSA Standard CAN/CSA-C225-M88, Vehicle Mounted Aerial Devices;

 Section 16.8 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Warning signal device

16.8  (1)  Mobile equipment in which the operator cannot directly or by mirror or other effective device see immediately behind the machine must have an automatic audible warning device which

(a) activates whenever the equipment controls are positioned to move the equipment in reverse, and

(b) if practicable, is audible above the ambient noise level.

(2)  Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 253/2001, s. 12 (b).]

[am. B.C. Reg. 253/2001, s. 12.]

 Section 16.8.1 was enacted by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 16.31 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(1)  The operator of mobile equipment is the only worker permitted to ride the equipment unless the equipment is a worker transportation vehicle meeting the requirements of Part 17 (Transportation of Workers), or when permitted by subsections (2) to (4).

 Section 16.31 (0.1), (3.1) and (3.2) were added by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Section 19.1 definitions of "approved" and "electrical worker" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

"approved" as applied to electrical equipment, means that the equipment meets the requirements of the Electrical Safety Act;

"electrical worker" means a person who meets the requirements of the Electrical Safety Act for installing, altering or maintaining electrical equipment;

 Section 19.1 definition of "exposed" was added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 19.9 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

 Insulated aerial device

19.9  (1)  An insulated aerial device must be dielectrically tested at least annually in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA-C225-M88 Vehicle Mounted Aerial Devices and its insulating capability certified by the testing agency.

(2)  An insulated aerial device which has not passed the testing required by subsection (1) must be considered noninsulated and any markings or identification on the device indicating insulated capability must be removed or effectively covered over and the user informed of the noninsulated status of the device.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 4.]

 Section 19.10 (2) (a) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

(a) require the use of appropriate electrical protective equipment, including rubber gloves and cover up, and other necessary live line tools,

 Section 19.15 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(2)  A ground fault circuit interrupter must not be used in place of grounding except as permitted by the Electrical Safety Act and the regulations made under it.

 Section 19.24 and heading BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

Working Close to Energized High Voltage Equipment and Conductors

 Minimum clearance

19.24  (1)  The employer must ensure that at least the minimum applicable distance specified in Table 19-1 is maintained between exposed, energized high voltage electrical equipment and conductors and any worker, work, tool, machine, equipment or material, unless otherwise permitted by this Part.

(2)  The employer must accurately determine the voltage of any energized electrical equipment or conductor and the minimum distance from it required by subsection (1).

Table 19-1: General limits of approach

VoltageMinimum distance
Phase to phaseMetresFeet
Over 750 V to 75 kV310
Over 75 kV to 250 kV4.515
Over 250 kV to 550 kV620

 Section 19.24.1 was added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 19.24.2 were added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 19.25 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(1)  If the minimum distance in Table 19-1 cannot be maintained because of the circumstances of work or the inadvertent movement of persons or equipment, an assurance in writing on a form acceptable to the Board and signed by a representative of the owner of the power system, must be obtained.

 Section 19.26 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(1)  If exposed high voltage electrical equipment and conductors cannot be isolated, rerouted or guarded, work must not be done within the minimum distance in Table 19-1 until approval is obtained from the Board and the following precautions are taken:

 Section 19.26 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(1)  If exposed high voltage electrical equipment and conductors cannot be isolated, rerouted or guarded, work must not be done within the minimum distance in Table 19-1A until approval is obtained from the Board and the following precautions are taken:

(a) the area within which equipment or materials are to be moved must be barricaded and supervised to restrict entry only to those workers necessarily engaged in the work;

(b) a safety watcher must be designated;

(c) a positive means must be provided for the safety watcher to give a clear, understandable stop signal to workers in the area, and the watcher must give the stop signal by no other means.

 Section 19.29 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

19.29  Qualified workers and workers under their direct supervision may work within the minimum distances to energized high voltage electrical equipment and conductors, as specified in Table 19-1 and Table 19-2, when authorized by the owner of the power system and using work procedures acceptable to the Board.

 Section 19.30 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(1)  Before commencing tree pruning or falling close to energized high voltage overhead conductors, the worksite must be inspected by a qualified person, authorized by the owner of the power system, to identify any hazardous areas, including situations where any part of a tree to be pruned or felled is within the applicable minimum distance from an energized conductor as specified in Table 19-1, or may fall within that distance.

 Section 19.32 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

19.32  Tree pruning or falling within the minimum distances in Table 19-1 from overhead energized high voltage conductors must be carried out by a worker authorized by the owner of the power system to do such work.

 Section 19.33 (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Site crew requirements

19.33  Tree pruning or falling is not permitted within the minimum distances in Table 19-1 from overhead high voltage energized conductors, unless

 Section 19.34 (1), (3) and (6) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

(1)  A certified utility arborist and any conductive tool must not be closer to an energized high voltage conductor than the applicable limit of approach in column B of Table 19-3.

(3)  An apprentice utility arborist may work up to the limit of approach permitted for a certified utility arborist in subsections (1) and (5) when in the presence of and under the direct supervision of a certified utility arborist or a qualified electrical worker with tree pruning and falling training.

(6)  Vegetation touching an energized high voltage conductor or within the applicable limit in column A of Table 19-3 for a conductor at a potential of 75 kV or more must be removed only with the line isolated and grounded or by a qualified electrical worker using approved live line methods.

 Section 19.34.1 was enacted by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

 Section 20.1 the definition "asbestos-containing material" was added by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Section 20.1 the definitions "application drawings", "falsework" and "reshoring" were added by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 20.1 the definitions of "formwork" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

"formwork" includes the foundation, supporting structure, and mould into which concrete will be placed;

 Section 20.1 the definition "formwork designer" BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 14/2019, effective January 30, 2019.

"formwork designer" means the professional engineer responsible for the design of formwork;

 Section 20.2 (c) (i) and (ii) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(i)  the removal, encapsulation or enclosure of friable asbestos building materials, or

(ii)  the demolition, dismantling or repair of any building or structure, or parts thereof, in which insulating materials containing asbestos have been used, or in which asbestos products have been manufactured, or

 Section 20.2 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Notice of project

20.2   (1) The owner or, if the owner engages another person to be the prime contractor, then that person must ensure that the Board receives, in writing or by fax, a notice of project (NOP) at least 24 hours before starting a construction project if

(a) the total cost of labour and materials for the work exceeds $100 000, or

(b) all or part of the permanent or temporary works, except pre-engineered or pre-manufactured building and structural components, are required to be designed by a professional engineer, or

(c) the construction activity involves

(i) the removal, encapsulation or enclosure of friable asbestos-containing material, as that term is defined in section 6.1, or

(ii) the demolition, dismantling or repair of any building or structure, or parts thereof, in which asbestos-containing material has been used, or in which asbestos products have been manufactured, or

(iii) an abatement project or other activity involving significant disturbance of lead-containing coatings on buildings or structures, or

(iv) similar activities which may expose workers to a significant risk of occupational disease, or

(d) the construction project is a new erection, a major alteration, a structural repair or a demolition of

(i) a building more than 2 stories high or more than 6 m (20 ft) in height, or

(ii) a bridge, or

(iii) an earth or water retaining structure more than 3 m (10 ft) in height, or

(iv) a silo, chimney or similar structure more than 6 m (20 ft) in height, or

(e) workers will be working in a compressed air atmosphere or in a caisson, tunnel, underground working or cofferdam, or

(f) the construction project includes a trench more than 1.2 m (4 ft) in depth and over 30 m (100 ft) in length or includes another type of excavation more than 1.2 m (4 ft) in depth, which a worker may be required to enter.

(2) The notice of project required by subsection (1) must contain

(a) the name and address of the owner and, if applicable, any other person engaged to be the prime contractor for the project,

(b) the municipal address of the project, or its location in relation to the nearest highway,

(c) a description of the project including a list of the applicable items in subsection (1),

(d) the starting date and the anticipated duration of the project,

(e) the estimated total cost of labour and materials for the project, and

(f) if the project involves an activity listed in subsection (1) (c), detailed written work procedures which will be used to minimize the risk to workers who might be exposed to a hazardous material specified by that subsection.

(3) A copy of the notice of project must be posted at the construction site before work commences.

(4) If it is necessary to do immediate work in order to prevent injury to workers or damage to property, work on the project may commence immediately, and the nearest Board office must be provided with an NOP at the earliest possible time.

(5) If a shaft, tunnel, underground working, caisson or cofferdam is to be constructed, the notice of project must confirm that drawings for all temporary and permanent ground support will be available on site for the duration of the project.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 56; 188/2011, App. B, s. 14.]

 Section 20.2.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 20.16 heading BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Concrete Formwork and Falsework

 Section 20.16.1 was enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 20.16.2 was enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 20.17 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Specifications and plans

20.17   (1) The employer must ensure that a set of plans and specifications meeting the requirements of CSA Standard S269.1-1975, Falsework for Construction Purposes and CSA Standard CAN/CSA-S269.3-M92, Concrete Formwork is prepared for the formwork for each job and for all items of concrete work, the failure of which could cause injury.

(2) Erection drawings and supplementary instructions for concrete formwork, falsework and reshoring must be certified by a professional engineer and available at the site during erection, use and removal of the concrete formwork, falsework and reshoring.

(3) The following types of concrete formwork require erection drawings and supplementary information certified by a professional engineer:

(a) flyforms;

(b) gang forms;

(c) jump forms;

(d) vertical slip forms;

(e) formwork more than 4 m (13 ft) in height;

(f) suspended forms for slabs, stairs and landings;

(g) beam forms;

(h) single sided forms over 2 m (6.5 ft) in height;

(i) cantilever forms;

(j) bridge deck forms;

(k) shaft lining forms;

(l) tunnel lining forms;

(m) forms so designated by the designer of the structure.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

 Section 20.18 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Supervision

20.18   (1) A qualified supervisor experienced in the construction of temporary support structures must supervise the erection and use of formwork and falsework.

(2) Workers must be properly instructed on the hazards that they may be exposed to and on the precautions to be taken while around or on formwork and falsework.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. G, s. 1.]

 Section 20.19 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Erection drawing information

20.19   (1) Erection drawings and supplementary instructions must clearly show all information necessary to accurately and safely assemble the concrete formwork, falsework and reshoring to the design requirements.

(2) The documents required by subsection (1) must include at least

(a) erection drawings showing sufficient plan and section views and connection details, enlarged where necessary, to clearly describe the formwork and permit accurate assembly,

(b) the quality and grade of materials to be used for the components and their connection,

(c) an accurate description of proprietary items, including fittings, to permit field identification,

(d) the load bearing capacity required of the material upon which the sills are to be placed and, where necessary, details of procedures to be used to develop and maintain the required capacity,

(e) the minimum dimensions of sills or other foundation members,

(f) construction, erection and dismantling procedures which require special attention including, where applicable, handling multi-use formwork panels,

(g) details of supports necessary to maintain lateral stability and resist sidesway and racking, specifying the materials, dimensions and locations of external braces, ties, and other support devices,

(h) where structural components connect together, the connections detailed to prevent accidental displacement or rotation of the components,

(i) the reshore plan where applicable,

(j) details of the form or mould into which concrete will be placed,

(k) sufficient load and deflection information to permit a professional engineer to understand the design of the concrete formwork and falsework,

(l) the requirement for outstanding field design and detailing where applicable, and

(m) the sequence, method and rate of load placement to prevent overloading of any part of the formwork.

 Section 20.20 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Responsibility for design

20.20   (1) A professional engineer must be responsible for all field designs, details and changes including the effect they may have on the original design.

(2) Field designs and changes must be documented as required by section 20.19 and must be available at the site before and during placement of concrete or other significant loading of the formwork or falsework.

 Section 20.21 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Continuity of engineering

20.21   The employer, or if the formwork affects workers of more than one employer, the owner or principal contractor, must ensure continuity of design, construction and inspection in the event of a change of professional engineers, or if the separate work of 2 or more professional engineers is involved.

 Section 20.22 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Equipment requirements

20.22   (1) Equipment, materials and hardware which cannot be identified as meeting the standards specified in the professional engineer's drawings and specifications must not be used.

(2) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 36.]

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 36.]

 Section 20.23 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Concrete placing hazards

20.23   (1) Protruding ends of reinforcing steel which are hazardous to workers must be removed or effectively guarded.

(2) If a worker is required to be underneath the formwork during a concrete pour or placement of another significant load, the worker must be restricted from the areas where the loads are placed.

(3) If loads such as bundles of reinforcing steel are being placed on the formwork, or if concrete has just been placed on the formwork, workers must be restricted from the area under those portions of the formwork until it can be assured that the formwork will withstand the load.

(4) Placement of concrete or other loads must stop if any weakness, undue settlement or excess distortion of formwork of a type listed in section 20.17 (3) occurs, and may only restart after the formwork has been repaired or strengthened as specified by a professional engineer.

(5) Loads must not be applied to uncured concrete structures except as permitted by the erection drawings and supplementary instructions.

 Section 20.24 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Flyform drawings

20.24   (1) Erection drawings must be detailed to show

(a) a plan view, a longitudinal section, and a cross section for each type of flyform panel, and

(b) the weight, the calculated position of the centre of gravity and the position of the pickup points for each type of flyform panel.

(2) The design on the erection drawings and supplementary instructions for a flyform panel must provide that as soon as a flyform panel is landed on a supporting surface, before anyone climbs or walks on the panel, and before reinforcing steel or concrete is placed on the panel, the panel must

(a) be able to resist a minimum horizontal load of 3.6 kN (800 lbs) applied in any direction on the top edge,

(b) have a minimum safety factor against overturning about any possible axis of

(i) 1.6 when dead load plus most severe live load configuration plus horizontal loads are considered, and

(ii) 2.0 when dead load plus most severe live load configuration or dead load plus horizontal loads are considered,

(c) have a minimum safety factor of 1.5 against the panel sliding along the supporting surface, and

(d) have flyform legs placed as necessary to attain the required safety factor against overturning.

(3) If any of the requirements of subsection (2) cannot be obtained for a panel, the panel must, before being unhooked from the crane or hoist, be secured to the permanent structure or an adjacent panel in a manner specified by the formwork designer.

(4) When all flyform panels have been assembled to form a continuous piece of concrete formwork, the concrete formwork and falsework must meet the requirements of section 20.17 (1).

 Section 20.25 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Flyform handling

20.25   (1) The erection drawings and supplementary instructions for flyforms must show a step by step procedure for all phases of each cycle of assembly, flying, use, dismantling and reuse of each flyform panel, including special procedures for non-typical floors.

(2) If any flyform panel is not inherently stable for all possible conditions of load, special notation on the flyform design documents must draw attention to the procedure for obtaining stability.

(3) The erection drawings and supplementary instructions required by subsections (1) and (2), including special procedures required for non-typical floors, must be made available to workers involved in any part of the assembly, flying, use, dismantling and reuse of each flyform panel.

 Section 20.26 (3) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

(3) If a gangform is being reused on the same jobsite without modification, an inspection by a qualified person must be performed before each pour, in which case a new professional engineer's inspection certificate under subsection (1) is not required.

 Section 20.26 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Inspections

20.26   (1) Immediately before placement of concrete or other intended loading, the employer must ensure that the concrete formwork and falsework is inspected and an engineering certificate is issued by a professional engineer, which

(a) indicates the specific areas inspected,

(b) certifies that the concrete formwork and falsework has been erected in accordance with the latest approved erection drawings and supplementary instructions, and

(c) certifies that specified reshoring is in place.

(2) The certificate required by subsection (1) must be available at the site for inspection by an officer.

(3) If a gang form is being reused on the same jobsite with any modification to the gang form design or method of erection, subsection (1) applies in relation to the reuse of the gang form.

(4) If a gang form is being reused on the same jobsite without modification to the gang form design or method of erection certified under subsection (1), immediately before placement of concrete or other intended loading, the employer must ensure that the gang form is inspected by a qualified person who

(a) confirms that the gang form has been erected in accordance with the latest approved erection drawings and supplementary instructions, and

(b) documents the inspection and the confirmation under paragraph (a), including the specific location at which the gang form is being reused and the date of the inspection.

(5) The documents required by subsection (4) (b) must be available at the site for inspection by an officer.

[am. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. G, s. 1.]

  Sections 20.26.1 to 20.26.3 were enacted by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Section 20.27 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(1)  A concrete pump, placing boom and mast must bear a legible identification plate specifying

 Section 20.27 (1) (d) and (2) BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(d) the maximum pressure the concrete pump can generate.

(2)  A concrete placing boom or mast not affixed to a concrete pump must bear an identification plate specifying

(a) the manufacturer's name,

(b) the model and serial number,

(c) the maximum allowable concrete pressure in the delivery pipe, and

(d) the maximum allowable pipe diameter and permitted wall thickness.

 Section 20.27 (1) (e) was added by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Section 20.28 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 188/2011 effective February 1, 2012.

 Manufacturer's manual

20.28  The manufacturer's operation and maintenance manual for a concrete pump, placing boom and mast must be readily accessible to the operator and to maintenance personnel.

 Section 20.29 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Inspection and maintenance records

20.29  Records of inspection and maintenance as required by Part 4 (General Conditions) must be made by the equipment operator and other persons inspecting and maintaining a concrete placing boom or mast.

 Section 20.30 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Pre-use inspection

20.30  (1)  The operator must inspect a concrete placing boom or mast and test its safety and control devices before use on each shift and record the results of the inspection and tests in accordance with section 20.29.

(2)  Any defects found in the concrete placing boom or mast must be recorded according to section 20.29 and reported immediately to the supervisor or employer, who must determine the course of action.

(3)  If a defect may affect the safe operation of the concrete placing boom or mast, the equipment must not be used until the defect has been remedied.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 58.]

 Section 20.30.1 was added by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Section 20.31 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Controls

20.31  Controls for a concrete placing boom or mast must have their function clearly identified.

 Section 20.32 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(2)  Hydraulic holding valves must be used on a placing boom or mast if hydraulic hose or coupling failure could result in uncontrolled movement of mechanisms.

 Section 20.36 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Emergency shutoff

20.36  A concrete pump must have a clearly labelled emergency stop switch near the hopper which if activated will stop the pumping action.

 Section 20.40 BEFORE amended by Bc Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Outriggers

20.40  (1)  Outriggers must be used in accordance with the concrete placing boom or mast manufacturer's specifications.

(2)  Extendible outriggers for a concrete placing boom or mast must be marked to indicate maximum extension.

(3)  A concrete placing boom or mast manufactured after January 1, 1999 must have its outriggers or jacks permanently marked to indicate the maximum load they will transmit to the ground.

 Section 20.41 (3) BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(3)  A concrete placing boom or mast must not be used to drag hoses or other loads.

 Section 20.47 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Equipment inspection

20.47  A concrete placing boom and mast must be inspected in accordance with good engineering practice at intervals not exceeding 12 months, repaired as necessary, and certified safe for use by a professional engineer, the manufacturer or the manufacturer's authorized agent.

 Section 20.47 (2) (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(2) Despite section 20.26 of this regulation,

 Section 20.48 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Repair certification

20.48  Replacement parts used for repair of a concrete placing boom or mast must meet or exceed the original manufacturer's specifications or be certified by a professional engineer.

 Section 20.48.1 was added by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Sections 20.50 to 20.52 BEFORE they were repealed by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 Restriction on use

20.50  A concrete placing boom or mast must not be used to hoist loads.

 Compressed air cleaning

20.51  (1)  A concrete delivery pipe system other than an individual section of pipe may be cleaned out using compressed air, but the system must be securely anchored before such cleaning is done.

(2)  Any flexible discharge hose must be removed before cleaning out concrete delivery pipes using compressed air.

(3)  Only workers essential to the clean out process may be in the vicinity of concrete delivery pipes when they are pressurized with air.

(4)  An air system being used to clean out concrete delivery pipes must have a shutoff valve.

(5)  A trap basket must be attached to the discharge end of the concrete delivery pipe to receive the clean out ball or go-devil.

(6)  A blowout cap must have a bleed valve to relieve air pressure in a delivery pipe being cleaned using compressed air.

(7)  Delivery pipes must be depressurized before clamps and fittings are released.

 Operator's duties

20.52  The operator of a concrete placing boom or mast must have full control of the pump and placing equipment controls whenever the equipment is operating and engage in no other duties while operating the concrete pump and placing boom or mast.

 Section 20.79 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Underground utilities

20.79  (1)  Before excavating or drilling with powered tools and equipment, the location of all underground utility services in the area must be accurately determined, and any danger to workers from the services must be controlled.

(2)  Excavation or drilling work in proximity to an underground service must be undertaken in conformity with the requirements of the owner of the service.

(3)  Pointed tools must not be used to probe for underground gas and electrical services.

(4)  Powered equipment used for excavating must be operated so as to avoid damage to underground utility services or danger to workers.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. E, s. 15.]

 Section 20.112 (a) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(a) inspect the site to identify any asbestos, lead or other heavy metal or toxic, flammable or explosive materials that may be handled, disturbed or removed,

 Section 20.112 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

Hazardous materials

20.112   Before work begins on the demolition or salvage of machinery, equipment, buildings or structures, the employer or owner must

(a) ensure that a qualified person inspects the site to identify any asbestos-containing materials, lead or other heavy metal or toxic, flammable or explosive materials that may be handled, disturbed or removed,

(b) have the inspection results available at the worksite, including any drawings, plans or specifications, as appropriate, to show the locations of any hazardous substances,

(c) ensure that any hazardous materials found are safely contained or removed, and

(d) if hazardous materials are discovered during demolition work that were not identified in the inspection required by paragraph (a), ensure that all work ceases until such materials are contained or removed.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. B, s. 15.]

 Section 20.113 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Disconnecting services

20.113  Demolition must not proceed until all electric, gas and other services which may endanger a worker have been disconnected as required by the owner of the applicable utility.

 Section 21.1 the definitions "electric detonator", "electric igniter", "electronic detonator", "initiating device" and "radio frequency transmitter" were added by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 21.1 definitions of "Misfire (mishole)", "primer" and "shunt" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

"misfire (mishole)" means a charge or part of a charge which, on initiation, failed to completely detonate or function, a dangerous condition;

"primer" means an explosive to which a detonator or other initiating device has been attached;

"shunt" means a metal (aluminum or brass) clip or foil used to short out an electric detonator by interconnecting the leg wires, or means the act of shorting out leg wires by twisting them together;

 Section 21.3 (2) (d), (e) and (f) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(d) the types of explosives, detonators, and blasting machine used,

(e) a factual account of events including the blaster's log records, and

(f) the action taken by the employer.

 Section 21.3 (2) (d.1) and (g) were added by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 21.24 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(2) Electric detonators must be transported in their original containers, with their leg wires shunted, as shipped by the manufacturer.

 Section 21.25 (b) (v) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(v)  attended by the blaster of record, or a qualified person designated by the blaster, at all times when explosives are being carried, unless the prior permission of the Board has been obtained.

 Section 21.55 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(2) Prior written permission of the Board must be obtained before any pneumatic loading is carried out at a hole which contains an electric detonator.

 Section 21.58 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(1) Precautions must be taken to prevent premature detonation of electric detonators from sources of electricity.

(2) Blasting circuits must be kept on the ground with bare connections sufficiently elevated to prevent current leakage.

 Section 21.59 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Extraneous currents

21.59   Electric detonators must not be used when extraneous current exceeds 50 milliamps.

 Section 21.60 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(1) Precautions must be taken during handling of electric detonators to prevent premature detonation caused by static electricity.

 Section 21.61 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(1) During electrical blasting, minimum distances from radio frequency transmitters as detailed in Institute of Makers of Explosives, Safety Guide for the Prevention of Radio Frequency Radiation Hazards in the Use of Commercial Electric Detonators (Blasting Caps) Safety Library Publication No. 20, 1988 as amended from time to time, must be maintained.

(2) If the minimum distance has not otherwise been determined, electrical blasting circuits are not permitted within

(a) 100 m (330 ft) of a CB or other mobile or portable radio frequency transmitter, and

(b) 1 000 m (3 300 ft) of an AM, FM, TV, or other fixed radio frequency transmitter.

 Section 21.61 (1.1) was added by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 21.62 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(2) When electric blasting circuits are being connected, traffic control persons must be posted to instruct vehicle operators to turn radio frequency transmitters off.

 Section 21.63 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Testing circuits

21.63   Each electrical circuit must be tested before firing using an instrument acceptable to the Board, and the measured resistance must be recorded in the blasting log.

 Section 21.63.1 was enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 21.67 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Firing lines

21.67   The firing lines must not be attached to the blasting machine or blasting circuit until all charges are placed, connected and ready to be fired.

 Section 21.69 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply to avalanche control, single underground headings, buried seismic work in isolated locations or other circumstances deemed appropriate by the Board, in which case the blaster must ensure that alternative warning procedures acceptable to the Board are used.

 Section 21.71 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

After the blast

21.71   After a blast is detonated, the blaster must not allow any other worker to enter the blasting area until

(a) the area has been examined by the blaster for misfires and other hazards,

(b) the "all clear" has been sounded, and

(c) the blaster gives permission for work to proceed.

 Section 21.72 by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Electrical blasting

21.72   After a blast is electrically detonated the blaster must not enter the blasting area until

(a) the blaster has disconnected the firing cables from the blasting machine and has short circuited the lead wires, or

(b) if the blast was detonated from a power line, the blaster has disconnected the firing lines and locked the switch open.

 Section 21.73 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Misfires

21.73   (1) When a blast initiated by electrical methods cannot be verified to have completely detonated, or is suspected to have misfired, the blaster must disconnect the firing lines from the blasting machine, and wait at least 10 minutes before permitting anyone to enter the danger area.

(2) When a blast initiated by a safety fuse cannot be verified to have completely detonated, or is suspected to have misfired, the blaster must wait at least 30 minutes after the estimated time of detonation before permitting anyone to enter the danger area.

 Section 21.84 (1) (a) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(a) the blaster has first ensured that all leg wires are shunted together, drill cuttings are spread out and levelled, the leg wires are coiled as close to the ground as possible while never exceeding 15 cm (6 in) above the ground level, and the holes are suitably user identified, and recorded in the blasting log, and

 Section 22.1 definition of "underground working supervisor" was added by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 22.12 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Underground supervisors

22.12   (1) The employer must ensure that every worker involved in the active excavation or rehabilitation of an underground working is under the direct supervision of the holder of an underground excavation supervisor certificate acceptable to the Board.

(2) Workers not involved in the active excavation or rehabilitation of an underground working must be under the direction of a supervisor who holds an underground supervisor certificate.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. G, s. 2.]

 Section 22.12.1 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 22.63 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(2) The worker making the examination, before going off shift, must make a written report to the supervisor of any unusual condition found which has not been corrected.

 Section 22.63 (2.1) was added by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 22.67 (1) and (2) (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

(1) The employer must ensure that each supervisor is provided with current development plans for the supervisor's assigned area of responsibility which indicate the size, inclination and length of all development openings and drill holes, and points where openings are or will be within 8 m (25 ft) of a breakthrough.

(2) If an active heading is within 8 m (25 ft) of another underground opening or drill hole, the supervisor must, before any round is fired,

 Section 22.67 (2.1) was added by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 23.1, definition of "flow piping system" was added by BC Reg 142/2017, effective August 1, 2017.

 Section 23.6 (3) (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 142/2017, effective August 1, 2017.

(3) A well head may be used as a ground

 Section 23.15 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

(1)  A vessel must have a pressure relief device set to relieve at a pressure not exceeding 103 kPa (15 psi) if the vessel is

(a) not registered under the Power Engineers and Boiler and Pressure Vessel Safety Act,

(b) connected to a production facility or compressor station, and

(c) not directly open to the atmosphere.

 Section 23.15 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

 Pressure relief device — when required

23.15  (1)  A pressure vessel must have a pressure relief device set to relieve at a pressure not exceeding 103 kPa (15 psi) if

(a) the design of the pressure vessel is not registered under the Power Engineers, Boiler, Pressure Vessel and Refrigeration Safety Regulation, B.C. Reg. 104/2004,

(b) the pressure vessel is connected to a production facility or compressor station, and

(c) the pressure vessel is not directly open to the atmosphere.

(2)  A pressurized system, including any lines running from the output side of a pressure relief device which may be subject to accidental restriction, must be protected by a pressure relief device.

[am. B.C. Reg. 188/2011, App. J, s. 1.]

 Section 23.16 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

 Pressure relief device — installation

23.16  (1)  A pressure relief device must be set to discharge at a pressure not exceeding the manufacturer's recommended working pressure for the pipes and fittings in the system or as specified by a professional engineer.

(2)  Any fluid or material discharged through a pressure relief device must be piped to a place where it will not endanger workers.

(3)  The diameter of piping connected to the pressure side and the discharge side of a pressure relief device must not be smaller than the diameter of the openings to the device.

(4)  The piping on the discharge side of a pressure relief device must be

(a) secured to prevent movement, and

(b) sloped to drain fluids away from the pressure relief device if freezing could restrict the fluid flow.

(5)  A valve must not be installed in the discharge opening of a pressure relief device or the device's discharge pipe unless required by engineering design.

(6)  A pressure relief device that requires block valves by engineering design must have the block valves locked in the appropriate position.

(7)  Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 50.]

(8)  A guard must be installed around the shear pin and spindle of a pressure relief device.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 50.]

 Section 23.22 (a) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(a) be certified in the applicable Enform Canada driver training course acceptable to the Board, or

 Section 23.26.1 was enacted by BC Reg 142/2017, effective August 1, 2017.

 Section 23.63 (6) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(6) The principal contractor or owner must ensure that documentation is available on site showing that ground anchors meet the requirements of this Part, and that such documentation is signed by the person responsible for the adequacy of the anchors.

 Section 23.69 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 142/2017, effective August 1, 2017.

Flow piping

23.69   (1) Flow piping systems must be anchored during well testing or stimulation unless there is an effective quality assurance program to ensure integrity of the piping system.

(2) The quality assurance program must include routine inspections, non-destructive testing, pressure testing, identification of piping components, and piping specifications that meet the service application.

(3) If swivel joints or hoses are used in well stimulation and similar operations, the piping system must be secured at the well head and supply vehicle or pumping unit end with wire rope safety lines not less than 11 mm (7/16 in) in diameter, or chains of equal strength.

(4) Flowback lines must be anchored and restrained.

(5) If a system of piping and swivel joints with a pressure greater than 2000 kPa (300 psi) is used in well stimulation and similar operations

(a) the operation must be conducted by remote control,

(b) unauthorized workers must not enter the area between the point of discharge and the well head, and

(c) before starting operations, warning signs must be posted in the area stating "DANGER, NO UNAUTHORIZED WORKERS ALLOWED IN THIS AREA" or other similar language.

(6) Subsections (3) and (5) do not apply to well testing.

(7) In a flow piping system exceeding 3 500 kPa (500 psi),

(a) connections must be welded, flanged or hammer unions, and

(b) if there is only a threaded connection available at the well head, special precautions must be taken.

(8) A piping system must be completely depressurized before leaking connections or fittings are corrected.

(9) Hammering on a pressurized system is not permitted.

(10) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 55.]

(11) If liquid carbon dioxide or other liquified gas is used for well stimulation, the valve controls of the supply unit must be on the side opposite to the pipe supplying the liquified gas.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 55.]

 Section 23.69.1 was enacted by BC Reg 142/2017, effective August 1, 2017.

 Section 23.69.2 was enacted by BC Reg 142/2017, effective August 1, 2017.

 Section 23.69.3 was enacted by BC Reg 142/2017, effective August 1, 2017.

 Section 23.70 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 142/2017, effective August 1, 2017.

Piping, hoses and valves

23.70   (1) Only metal piping, or flexible hose designed for high pressure service, may be used between a service pump and the well head, and a check valve must be installed at the well head end of the piping.

(2) A bleedoff valve must be installed between the check valve and the well head.

 Section 23.72 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 142/2017, effective August 1, 2017.

Pressure testing requirements

23.72   (1) Before commencing a service operation, piping, pumps, valves and fittings to be used in the operation must be hydraulically tested to a pressure not less than 10% above the maximum anticipated operating pressure as determined by the well owner.

(2) Before commencing well testing or flowback operation, flow line piping, valves and fittings from the well head to the first pressure control choke must be hydraulically pressure tested to a pressure not less than 10% above the maximum anticipated shut-in pressure as determined by the well owner.

(3) When nitrogen is being used in well stimulation, the piping system may be pressure tested with nitrogen provided that the nitrogen treating line is connected to the main line as close to the well as practicable.

(4) Documentation of the testing must be available on the worksite for inspection by an officer.

(5) Air must be purged from the piping system before pressurizing low flash point hydrocarbons.

 Section 23.83 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(2)  If a lifeline is not used, 2 workers must be equipped with respiratory protective equipment and capable of effecting a rescue if required, and stationed immediately outside the entrance to the confined space.

 Section 24.1 the definition "fishing vessel" BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

"fishing vessel" means any vessel used in catching fish or collecting or transporting fish for landing;

 Section 24.1 the definitions "lifejacket", "personal flotation device (PDF)" and "working alone" were added by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 24.21 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(1) Diving operations, repetitive dives, and treatment of divers, must be carried out in strict accordance with tables and procedures published or approved by the Defense and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine (Canada).

  Section 24.34 (1) (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 195/2015, effective February 1, 2016.

(1) An incident investigation report meeting the requirements of Part 3 of the Workers Compensation Act and Part 3 of this Regulation (Rights and Responsibilities) must be submitted to the Board as soon as possible if any of the following occurs during a diving operation:

 Section 24.69 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Application

24.69   Sections 24.70 to 24.143 apply to all owners, masters and crewmembers of licensed commercial fishing vessels.

 Section 24.69.1 was enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 24.69.2 was enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 24.69.3 was enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 24.128 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

Personal flotation devices (PFDs)

24.128   When in the skiff, crewmembers must wear personal flotation devices meeting the requirements of the Board.

 Section 24.96.1 was enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 24.96.2 was enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Section 24.96.3 was enacted by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

 Part 26, table 26-8 item 1 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

1Grapple log and go aheadClose and go

 Section 26.1 definition of "mobile equipment" was added by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 26.13.4 was enacted by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

 Section 26.18 (part) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

26.18  In a forestry operation where there may be a risk of a landslide or avalanche

 Section 26.65 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

Bullboards

26.65   (1) For the protection of the driver, each logging truck must have, at the back of the cab, a substantial barrier that

(a) is at least 15 cm (6 in) higher than the cab, and

(b) is at least as wide as the cab.

(2) The barrier at the back of the cab of a self-loading logging truck may be less than the height specified in subsection (1) but must not be less than the cab height.

(3) For the purposes of subsection (1), the barrier must be capable of withstanding a horizontal forward static load equal to 40% of the weight of the cargo being transported that may shift and contact the barrier, with this load uniformly distributed over the entire barrier.

(4) The barrier of the logging truck must be

(a) designed, constructed and maintained so that it has no aperture large enough to permit any item of cargo to pass through it, and

(b) installed in a manner acceptable to the Board to ensure that the rated capacity of the barrier is not diminished.

(5) The barrier must be

(a) permanently marked with

(i) the name and address of its manufacturer,

(ii) the model number or serial number of the barrier, and

(iii) its rated capacity in terms of the cargo weight that may be transported in compliance with this section, or

(b) identified by carrying in the logging truck a copy of a letter that

(i) accurately describes the barrier,

(ii) certifies the model number or serial number of the barrier and its rated capacity in terms of the cargo weight it can carry, and

(iii) has been signed by the manufacturer or a professional engineer.

[en. B.C. Reg. 253/2001, s. 20; am. B.C. Regs. 73/2005; 18/2006, s. 1.]

 Section 26.83 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

(1)  When 2 or more vehicles are using a section of a road which is too narrow to permit them to pass, an effective traffic control system must be used by all vehicles on the road.

 Section 26.83 (2) (d) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

(d) instructional signs, including kilometre and road name/number signs, and the radio frequency for traffic control if one is being used.

 Section 26.83.1 was enacted by BC Reg 312/2012, effective February 1, 2013.

 Section 28.9 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 9/2017, effective May 1, 2017.

Control of environmental tobacco smoke exception

28.9   Sections 4.81 to 4.83 (Environmental tobacco smoke) do not apply in a private residence, except when a worker, other than the occupant of the residence, is working in the residence.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2004.]

 Section 28.12 BEFORE repealed by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

Biohazards exception

28.12   Section 6.36 (3) does not apply to agricultural operations on farm land.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2004.]

 Section 28.41 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 188/2011, effective February 1, 2012.

 ROPS exception for agricultural tractors

28.41  (1)  Section 16.22 (1) does not apply to an agricultural tractor manufactured on or before January 1, 1985.

(2)  An agricultural tractor manufactured after January 1, 1985 must be equipped with a rollover protective structure, except for

(a) a low profile tractor used in agricultural situations where there is low overhead clearance, such as orchards, hop yards, farm buildings and greenhouses where overhead clearance is not adequate to allow a tractor equipped with a rollover protective structure to operate, and when its use is incidental to the work in those situations, and

(b) an agricultural tractor fitted with implements incompatible with the rollover protective structure.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2004.]

 Section 29.16 (2) (a) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(a) name of the principal contractor and of the person responsible for the operation,

 Section 30.1 was renumbered to 30.1.1, and a new section 30.1 was added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Application

30.1  This Part applies to rooms, buildings or areas in buildings equipped with apparatus, equipment, chemicals or test animals and used for research, quality control, performance of tests, experiments or measurements, photographic development, or the preparation of drugs or other products in the natural sciences.

 Section 30.12 (6) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(6)  Biological safety cabinets used for handling a biological agent that is designated as a hazardous substance in section 5.1.1 must be operated and ventilated in accordance with the Laboratory Biosafety Manual issued by the World Health Organization, as amended from time to time, and the Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines issued by Health Canada, as amended from time to time.

 Section 30.13 (5) BEFORE spent, effective January 1, 2001.

(5)  Equipment purchased before April 15, 1998 is exempt from the application of subsection (3) until January 1, 2001.

 Section 30.13 (2) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(2)  Aerosol-proof safety heads or cups or other equally effective means to prevent exposure of workers must be used where biohazardous aerosols may be generated, where carcinogens are present or where radioactive samples pose a hazard to workers.

 Section 30.14 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

30.14  Written safe work procedures must be prepared for hazardous operations, including work methods involving hazardous chemicals, spill response, and handling of biohazardous materials, and workers must be adequately instructed in and follow the procedures.

 Section 30.15 BEFORE re-enacted by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Permitted quantities

30.15  Only the minimum necessary amounts of combustible, flammable, corrosive, toxic, biohazardous or highly reactive substances may be kept in the working area of the laboratory.

 Section 30.16 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

30.16  The transport of containers of flammable, corrosive, toxic, biohazardous or highly reactive substances through a laboratory must be done in a manner that will not pose a danger of damage to the containers.

 Section 30.17 (1) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(1)  Protective laboratory clothing used in laboratories where toxic, radioactive or biohazardous substances are handled must not be worn outside the work area and must not be stored in a manner or location whereby workers may be exposed to the hazardous substances.

 Section 30.17 (1.1) was added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Section 30.19 (5) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

(5)  Biohazardous waste material must be collected in separate, tightly covered containers before disposal.

 Section 30.26 BEFORE amended by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Biohazardous materials

30.26  (1)  Adequate facilities must be readily available for personal decontamination of workers who come in contact with biohazardous materials.

(2)  Work procedures which may generate aerosols containing biohazardous materials must be performed only under controlled conditions designed to minimize creation of the aerosols and prevent worker exposure to them.

(3)  For Risk Group 2 micro-organisms, sealed centrifuge safety heads, rotors or trunnion cups must be opened within a fume hood or biological safety cabinet unless there is a means of visually determining, by use of clear safety caps or other effective means, that no breakage or leaking has occurred.

(4)  For Risk Group 3 micro-organisms, sealed centrifuge safety heads, rotors or trunnion cups must be loaded and unloaded within a biological safety cabinet.

(5)  Work involving Risk Group 4 micro-organisms must be done as required by Health Canada Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines - 2nd edition (1996).

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

 Section 30.26 (6) was added by BC Reg 312/2010, effective February 1, 2011.

 Part 34, Sections 34.1 to 34.16 and Schedule 34-A were enacted by BC Reg 199/2014, effective February 1, 2015.

 Section 34.4 (1) (a) (i) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(i) International Code of Practice (2013) and General requirements for certification of personnel engaged in industrial rope access methods, Edition 6 (June 2009), published by the Industrial Rope Access Trade Association;

 Section 34.14 (d) (i) to (v) BEFORE amended by BC Reg 14/2019, effective June 3, 2019.

(d) meets the requirements of one or more of the following standards:

(i) CAN/CSA-Z94.1-05 Industrial Protective Headwear — Performance, selection, care, and use (published February, 2005);

(ii) ANSI/ISEA Z89.1-2009 American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection (published January 26, 2009);

(iii) EN 12492:2012 Mountaineering equipment. Helmets for mountaineers. Safety requirements and test methods (published August 31, 2012);

(iv) EN 397:2012+A1:2012 Industrial safety helmets (published April 30, 2013);

(v) UIAA 106 Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment — Helmets (published January, 2009).