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B.C. Reg. 296/97
W.C.B.
Deposited September 8, 1997
effective April 15, 1998
This consolidation is current to October 15, 2019.
Link to consolidated regulation (PDF)
Link to Point in Time

Workers Compensation Act

Occupational Health and Safety Regulation

[includes amendments up to B.C. Reg. 14/2019, June 3, 2019]

Part 29 — Aircraft Operations

Repealed

29.1   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. H, s. 3.]

General Requirements

Application

29.2   This Part applies to the use of aircraft in the workplace.

Pre-job planning and training

29.3   The employer must

(a) provide written safe work procedures for workers who are exposed to hazards from aircraft operations,

(b) ensure that workers are provided with adequate pre-job instruction and that the instruction is documented, and

(c) ensure that workers can demonstrate the ability to safely perform their tasks as required.

Repealed

29.4   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. H, s. 4.]

Communications

29.5   (1) The employer must ensure that effective communication between air and ground crews has been established before initiating airlift operations.

(2) If hand signals are used to communicate between air and ground crews

(a) only internationally recognized hand signals may be used,

(b) the designated signaller must be identified to the pilot in command by means of high visibility apparel and position, and

(c) all workers exposed to hazards from the airlifting operation must know and understand the hand signals.

Repealed

29.6-
29.8
 
Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. H, s. 5.]

Airlifted loads

29.9   (1) The employer must ensure that airlifted loads are not flown over workers.

(2) Workers must remain clear and in recognized safe areas when there is a hazard from airlifted loads.

Traffic control

29.10   The employer must ensure that effective traffic control measures are employed as required by Part 18 (Traffic Control) wherever airlifted loads will be flown over travelled roadways.

Rotorwash

29.11   The employer must ensure that helicopter rotorwash will not expose workers to undue risk.

Unstable materials

29.12   The employer must ensure that work areas are planned and maintained to avoid placing workers in hazardous proximity to unstable materials.

Repealed

29.13-
29.15
 
Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. H, s. 6.]

Forestry Operations

Notification

29.16   (1) The owner, or the person engaged by the owner to be the prime contractor, must give notice to the Board at least 2 weeks before commencing any operation involving aerial transport of logs or other products made of wood.

(2) The notice must provide the

(a) name of the prime contractor and of the person responsible for the operation,

(b) location, scheduled start date and expected duration of the operation, and

(c) type of logging activity to be done.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 74; 14/2019, App. G, s. 1.]

Site supervision

29.17   The employer must assign a person on site the responsibility for supervising and coordinating airlift operations.

Repealed

29.18-
29.19
 
Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. H, s. 7.]

Log loading areas

29.20   (1) Log loading areas must be separate from drop zones.

(2) Before accessing loading and drop zone areas, workers must communicate their intentions to aircraft and equipment operators, and get an "all clear" signal to proceed from the operators.

Pesticide Application

Repealed

29.21-
29.22
 
Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. H, s. 8.]

Flagpersons

29.23   A flagperson who may be exposed to pesticide spray or drift must wear protective clothing covering the head, body, hands and feet, and a respirator appropriate for the pesticide being applied.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. H, s. 9.]

Part 30 — Laboratories

Definition

30.1   In this Part, "biological agent" means a biological agent designated as a hazardous substance under section 5.1.1.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. N, s. 4.]

Application

30.1.1   This Part applies to rooms, buildings or areas in buildings equipped with apparatus, equipment, chemicals or test animals and used for research, quality control, performance of tests, experiments or measurements, photographic development, or the preparation of drugs or other products in the natural sciences.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. N, s. 3.]

General Requirements

Equipment operation

30.2   Operators of laboratory equipment must be adequately instructed and trained in the safe use of laboratory equipment and the precautions to be taken when the equipment is used.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 63.]

Repealed

30.3   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. E, s. 29.]

Plumbing

30.4   (1) Laboratory water faucets with goosenecks must be protected by vacuum breaks meeting the requirements of ANSI Standard ANSI/ASSE 1001-1990, Pipe Applied Atmospheric Type Vacuum Breakers.

(2) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 64 (b).]

(3) The location of an in-line vacuum break must be clearly identified.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 64.]

Fire protection

30.5   (1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. E, s. 30.]

(2) Suitable fire extinguishers of a size easily handled by laboratory workers must be immediately accessible wherever flammable materials are used or stored.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. E, s. 30.]

Guarding

30.6   (1) Laboratory equipment which presents a physical hazard to workers must be adequately guarded, shielded or isolated by location.

(2) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. D, s. 33.]

(3) Hazards of equipment use must be identified on the equipment.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. D, s. 33.]

Equipment ventilation

30.7   Laboratory equipment and instruments which may emit harmful quantities of a substance during their operation must be provided with an effective local exhaust ventilation system.

Definitions

30.7.1   In sections 30.8 to 30.11:

"laboratory fume hood" means an enclosed and mechanically ventilated workspace located in a laboratory, that is designed to

(a) draw air into the workspace and to prevent or minimize the escape of airborne contaminants out of the workspace, and

(b) allow a worker to conduct physical, chemical and biological manipulations inside the workspace;

"operational face opening" means an opening in a laboratory fume hood through which a worker may conduct work inside the hood;

"sash" means a vertical or horizontal panel on a laboratory fume hood that defines the operational face opening and provides a protective barrier between the worker conducting work inside the hood and the contents of the hood.

[en. B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. B, s. 1.]

Fume hoods

30.8   (1) A laboratory fume hood and its related ductwork must be designed, installed and maintained in accordance with the Industrial Ventilation, A Manual of Recommended Practice, published by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, as amended from time to time.

(2) A laboratory fume hood must

(a) be connected to a local exhaust ventilation system,

(b) provide average face velocities of 0.4 m/s (80 fpm) to 0.6 m/s (120 fpm) across the operational face opening,

(c) not have face velocities of less than 80% of the average face velocity required in paragraph (b) at any point across its operational face opening, and

(d) not have face velocities of more than 120% of the average face velocity required in paragraph (b) at any point across its operational face opening.

(2.1) A laboratory fume hood must have a sash that is positioned to protect the upper body and face of a worker working in the laboratory fume hood from accidental releases of the contents of the hood while allowing hand and arm access to equipment inside the hood.

(2.2) A laboratory fume hood with a movable sash must be clearly marked to identify the maximum size of the operational face opening that will maintain the average face velocities required in subsection (2) (b).

(2.3) The employer must ensure

(a) that before it is used, a commercially manufactured laboratory fume hood has been certified as being tested by the manufacturer, and

(b) following installation and before it is used, a custom built laboratory fume hood is tested on site by a qualified person.

(2.4) A laboratory fume hood tested under subsection (2.3) must demonstrate containment not greater than the control level of 0.05 ppm when tested under "as manufactured" test conditions in accordance with the methods described in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 110-1995, Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods.

(2.5) The installation of a laboratory fume hood must be certified by a professional engineer.

(3) A laboratory fume hood must be located to prevent cross drafts or other disruptive forces from lowering the air flow across the operational face opening to unacceptable levels.

(4) A laboratory fume hood and its ductwork must be constructed from materials compatible with its use.

(5) A laboratory fume hood that will be or is being used for working with

(a) radioactive material in amounts that exceed the exemption quantity specified by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, or

(b) perchloric acid

must be clearly labelled with applicable restrictions on its use.

(6) A laboratory fume hood must not be used for storage of chemicals unless it is used exclusively for this purpose and is labelled with this limitation.

(7) Controls for the operation of a laboratory fume hood and its service fixtures must be

(a) located on the outside of the laboratory fume hood, and

(b) immediately accessible to the worker conducting work in the laboratory fume hood.

(8) Despite subsection (7), water taps may be located inside a laboratory fume hood if the main shutoff valve for the water is located outside the laboratory fume hood.

(9) Equipment being used in a laboratory fume hood must

(a) be kept at least 15 cm (6 in.) from the operational face opening of the laboratory fume hood, and

(b) not adversely affect airflow into the laboratory fume hood.

(10) Written procedures must be developed and implemented to ensure safe use and operation of a laboratory fume hood.

[am. B.C. Regs. 315/2003, App. A, s. 15; 319/2007, App. B, s. 2.]

Airflow and containment monitoring

30.9   (1) Face velocities over the operational face opening of a laboratory fume hood must be quantitatively measured and recorded.

(2) The ability of a laboratory fume hood to

(a) maintain an inward flow of air across the operational face opening, and

(b) contain contaminants

must be assessed and recorded using a smoke tube or other suitable qualitative method.

(3) The actions described in subsections (1) and (2) must be performed

(a) after the laboratory fume hood is installed and before it is used,

(b) at least once in each 12 month period after installation, and

(c) after any repair or maintenance that could affect the air flow of the hood.

(4) If a laboratory fume hood is found to be operating with an average face velocity of less than 90% of the average face velocity required in section 30.8 (2), the employer must immediately take corrective action to bring the average face velocity within the required range of velocities.

(5) Airflow in a laboratory fume hood must be monitored continuously if loss of airflow will result in risk to a worker.

(6) A laboratory fume hood that is being installed must have an alarm capable of indicating when the average face velocity falls below the minimum average face velocity level required in section 30.8 (2) when the hood is in use.

[en. B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. B, s. 3.]

Ducting

30.10   (1) Laboratory fume hoods located in the same room or separate rooms may be connected to a common exhaust duct or manifold system if the following conditions are satisfied:

(a) the requirements of section 5.3.2 of ANSI/AIHA Standard Z9.5-2003, Laboratory Ventilation are met;

(b) controls to prevent backdrafts and pressure imbalances between rooms are installed;

(c) the ventilation design and installation of the common exhaust duct or manifold system is certified by a professional engineer.

(2) Despite subsection (1), laboratory fume hoods that are or will be used for working with

(a) radioactive materials in amounts that exceed the exemption quantity specified by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, or

(b) perchloric acid

must not be connected to a manifold system.

(3) Ducting used in the installation of a laboratory fume hood must be designed in accordance with established engineering principles.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. B, s. 65; 319/2007, App. B, s. 4.]

Exhaust discharge

30.11   Laboratory fume hood local exhaust ventilation systems must discharge to the atmosphere in such a manner that the discharged air will not be recirculated into the laboratory or other work areas.

[am. B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. B, s. 5.]

Biological safety cabinets

30.12   (1) The limitations of a biological safety cabinet must be clearly posted on the unit and followed by workers.

(2) Biological safety cabinets must be certified by a qualified person at least annually and before use after

(a) initial installation,

(b) change of the HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) filter,

(c) moving of the unit, and

(d) any repair or maintenance that could affect the seal of the HEPA filter.

(3) Certification procedures used for compliance with subsection (2) must meet the requirements of the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) Standard 49-2002, Class II (Laminar Flow) Biohazard Cabinetry, and a record of the results must be maintained.

(4) Recirculation of exhaust air into a workspace from a biological safety cabinet is not permitted where volatile toxic materials or flammable liquids or gases are used in the cabinet, or where volatile radioactive materials are used in amounts that exceed the exemption quantity specified by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

(5) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 319/2007, App. B, s. 6 (c).]

(6) Biological safety cabinets used for handling a biological agent must be operated and ventilated in accordance with the Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines 3rd edition, 2004, issued by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. A, s. 4; 319/2007, App. B, s. 6; 312/2010, App. N, s. 5.]

Centrifuges

30.13   (1) Centrifuge loads must be balanced by sample distribution.

(2) Aerosol-proof safety heads or cups or other equally effective means to prevent exposure of workers must be used where an aerosol containing a biological agent may be generated, where carcinogens are present or where radioactive samples pose a hazard to workers.

(3) Unless exempted by CSA Standard C22.2 No. 151-M1986 Laboratory Equipment, or other standard acceptable to the Board, centrifuge doors must be interlocked to prevent workers accessing spinning rotors.

(4) The interlock required by subsection (3) must prevent the door from opening while the rotor is spinning or cause the rotor to brake if the door is opened, or another equally effective means must be used to prevent a worker from accessing the spinning rotor.

(5) Spent as of January 1, 2001.

(6) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 66.]

(7) Rotors must be stored in a manner which will prevent them from being damaged.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. B, s. 66; 312/2010, App. N, s. 6.]

Procedures

30.14   Written safe work procedures must be prepared for hazardous operations, including work methods involving hazardous chemicals, spill response, and handling of a material that contains a biological agent, and workers must be adequately instructed in and follow the procedures.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. N, s. 7.]

Permitted quantities

30.15   Only the minimum necessary amount of biological agents and substances that are combustible, flammable, corrosive, toxic or highly reactive may be kept in the working area of the laboratory.

[en. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. N, s. 8.]

Transport of containers

30.16   The transport of containers of flammable, corrosive, toxic or highly reactive substances or biological agents through a laboratory must be done in a manner that will not pose a danger of damage to the containers.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2010, App. N, s. 9.]

Personal protection

30.17   (1) A worker must wear protective laboratory clothing in a laboratory where a toxic or radioactive substance or a biological agent is handled.

(1.1) Protective laboratory clothing worn in circumstances referred to in subsection (1) must not

(a) be worn outside an area where a worker is required to wear the protective work clothing, and

(b) be stored in a manner or location that might expose a worker to a hazardous substance.

(2) Smoking, eating or drinking is not permitted in any laboratory area.

(3) Food for consumption must not be kept in the laboratory, and laboratory glassware, vessels and containers must not be used to prepare or store food or beverages for consumption.

(4) Substances must not be pipetted by mouth.

(5) If hazardous chemicals or materials are handled, all affected workers must receive instruction and training in the proper handling and disposal of such materials.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 75; 312/2010, App. N, s. 10.]

Spills and other emergencies

30.18   (1) Accidental release or spills of chemicals or other hazardous substances must be controlled immediately, and cleaned up under the supervision of persons knowledgeable in the hazards involved and the precautions to be taken during the cleanup operations.

(2) Personal protective equipment required during emergency cleanup or escape must be kept immediately available.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 75.]

Waste disposal

30.19   (1) Laboratory waste must be disposed of in a manner which ensures that workers are protected from injury.

(2) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. E, s. 31 (b).]

(3) Before disposal, organic solvents and flammable wastes must be collected in separate, tightly covered containers or in an equally effective manner.

(4) Before disposal, water solutions containing azides must first be inactivated, and contact with heavy metals or other incompatible contaminants must be prevented.

(5) Waste material that contains a biological agent must be collected in separate, tightly covered containers before disposal.

(6) Containers of segregated waste must be clearly identified as to their intended use.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. E, s. 31; 312/2010, App. N, s. 11.]

Specific Substances and Procedures

Explosive and highly reactive materials

30.20   (1) Quantities of explosive and highly reactive material available at the workbench or in the work area must be restricted to amounts immediately required for the work day.

(2) Storage facilities for explosive and highly reactive materials must be located and designed so as to prevent risk to workers.

(3) Explosive and highly reactive materials must be stored in a manner free from shock, vibration or other conditions which may compromise the stability of the material.

(4) If due to the nature of the laboratory work, explosions or implosions may result, the laboratory apparatus or equipment involved in such work must be adequately shielded and the operators must be provided with and must wear suitable personal protective devices, and wherever practicable the work must be safely isolated from workers by distance.

Perchloric acid

30.21   (1) Perchloric acid must be used in a fume hood designed exclusively for its use and posted with a notice which

(a) identifies the hood as being for perchloric acid use, and

(b) prohibits the use or storage of combustibles in the hood.

(2) Exhaust ducts must be as short as possible, routed directly outdoors with no interconnections to other exhaust ducts, and provided with washdown facilities.

(3) No more than 6.4 kg (14 lb.) of perchloric acid may be stored in a laboratory unless the laboratory facility consists of several smaller laboratories physically separated as fire compartments meeting the requirements of the BC Fire Code, in which case a maximum of 6.4 kg (14 lb.) of perchloric acid may be stored in each laboratory.

(4) Containers of perchloric acid must be stored in such a manner that, in the event of breakage, the spilled acid will not contact flammable materials, wood or similar combustible materials.

(5) Stored perchloric acid must be inspected at least monthly and if any discolouration is noted it must be disposed of immediately and in a safe manner.

(6) Anhydrous perchloric acid may only be used if freshly made, and any unused perchloric acid must be disposed of safely at the end of the experiment or procedure but must not be kept for more than one day.

(7) Direct flames, oil baths and electrical stirring equipment must not be used to heat perchloric acid.

(8) Rubber stoppers or equipment with rubber components must not be used with perchloric acid.

(9) Spilled perchloric acid must immediately be neutralized and cleaned up using safe procedures, and waste material from the cleanup must be kept moist, sealed in plastic bags, placed in a separate covered metal waste receptacle and disposed of as soon as possible.

Picric acid

30.22   (1) Solid picric acid must be stored with at least 10% moisture content and regular inspections must be made to ensure that the minimum moisture content is maintained.

(2) Solutions of picric acid must not be allowed to accumulate and dry around cap threads.

(3) Materials suspected of being in an unacceptable condition must be safely handled and disposed of by workers instructed in the applicable hazards, precautions and safe disposal methods.

Peroxide-forming compounds

30.23   (1) Peroxide-forming compounds must be inspected and tested for peroxides regularly after the container is first opened, and records of the tests must be maintained.

(2) Compounds contaminated with peroxide materials must be disposed of using safe work procedures or must be treated chemically to eliminate the peroxides.

Cryogenic liquids

30.24   (1) Containers used for storage, transport and dispensing of cryogenic liquids must be designed for that purpose.

(2) Indoor dispensing stations and storage locations for cryogenic liquids must be adequately ventilated and monitored to prevent the development of harmful atmospheres.

(3) Dispensing stations and freezers with automatic filling cycles for cryogenic liquids must be posted with a sign identifying the materials, the hazards and the precautions required.

Sharps

30.25   (1) Safe means of handling needles and other sharp materials must be provided and used.

(2) Recapping of needles before disposal is not permitted unless the recapping device is specifically designed for single handed use, or is otherwise safe for use.

Biological agents and human pathogens

30.26   (1) Adequate facilities must be readily available for personal decontamination of workers who come in contact with a biological agent.

(2) Work procedures which may generate aerosols containing a biological agent must be performed only under controlled conditions designed to minimize creation of the aerosols and prevent worker exposure to them.

(3) For Risk Group 2 human pathogens, sealed centrifuge safety heads, rotors or trunnion cups must be opened within a fume hood or biological safety cabinet unless there is a means of visually determining, by use of clear safety caps or other effective means, that no breakage or leaking has occurred.

(4) For Risk Group 3 human pathogens, sealed centrifuge safety heads, rotors or trunnion cups must be loaded and unloaded within a biological safety cabinet.

(5) Work involving Risk Group 4 human pathogens must be done as required by the Laboratory Biosafety Guidelines 3rd edition, 2004, issued by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

(6) In this section:

"Risk Group 2 human pathogens" mean the human pathogens that are classified by the Public Health Agency of Canada as Risk Group 2 human pathogens;

"Risk Group 3 human pathogens" mean the human pathogens that are classified by the Public Health Agency of Canada as Risk Group 3 human pathogens;

"Risk Group 4 human pathogens" mean the human pathogens that are classified by the Public Health Agency of Canada as Risk Group 4 human pathogens.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5; 312/2010, App. N, s. 12.]

Animal handling

30.27   (1) Animal quarters and handling areas must be maintained in a clean, hygienic state.

(2) Work procedures and handling methods must be designed to control the spread of aerosols.

(3) Animal health must be monitored by qualified personnel and quarantine measures must be taken as required for infected animals.

(4) Appropriate handling and restraint equipment must be available to workers, and workers must use this equipment, as required, to prevent injury due to bites or other accidents.

(5) Workers must be instructed and trained in effective animal handling techniques.

Microtomes

30.28   Microtome blades must be stored in a safe manner with the blade edge guarded.

Electrophoresis

30.29   (1) Electrophoresis apparatus must be designed and maintained so that any hazardous electrical current is shut off when the cover is opened.

(2) Equipment must display a label warning workers of the electrical hazard, and all high voltage components must be guarded to prevent worker contact.

Part 31 — Firefighting

Definitions

31.1   In this Part:

"emergency incident" means a specific emergency operation of a fire department or industrial fire brigade;

"fire chief" means the highest ranking person in charge of a fire department or industrial fire brigade;

"fire department" means a fire brigade operated as a public service by an employer specified in clause (c) of the definition of "worker" in section 1 of the Workers Compensation Act;

"firefighter" means any worker employed in firefighting, fire inspection, fire investigation, the maintenance of firefighting equipment, the training for and direction of those activities, or other similar duties;

"firefighting vehicle" means an emergency vehicle used for firefighting;

"incident commander" means the firefighter in overall command of an emergency incident;

"industrial fire brigade" means an organization established by an employer to protect the employer's premises where the nature of the business creates specific hazards for which specialized training and equipment is required;

"structure" means a building, vehicle, vessel or similar enclosed location.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 76.]

Application

31.2   This Part applies to employers and to workers who are employed in firefighting activities on a full or part time basis, including volunteer firefighting in municipal service and industrial fire brigades under Part 1 of the Workers Compensation Act, but does not apply to forest fire fighting.

General Requirements

Health and safety committee

31.3   (1) If an employer is required under Part 3 of the Workers Compensation Act to establish a joint committee or worker health and safety representative, then a fire department or industrial fire brigade operated by the employer must have a separate joint committee or a worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

(2) Subsection (1) does not affect any obligation to have a workplace health and safety program for the whole of the employer's operations.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 77.]

Instruction and direction

31.4   The employer must ensure the adequate instruction and direction of firefighters in the safe performance of their duties.

Procedures

31.5   (1) Written procedures must be established and followed by a fire department or industrial fire brigade to

(a) manage and track firefighters at an emergency incident,

(b) manage exposure to bloodborne pathogens,

(c) manage stress arising from an emergency incident that is likely to cause adverse health effects to firefighters,

(d) provide for effective traffic control at emergency incidents, and

(e) operate firefighting vehicles during emergency and non-emergency travel.

(2) Written procedures must be established and followed by a fire department or industrial fire brigade for the following situations, where applicable:

(a) fires in buildings 7 storeys or over;

(b) firefighting over water and underground;

(c) fires and other emergency incidents involving hazardous substances;

(d) rescue from high angles, confined spaces, trenches, excavations and water;

(e) disaster planning and response;

(f) electrical emergencies.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 78.]

Rest and rehabilitation

31.6   The emergency incident commander must make suitable provision for rest and rehabilitation for firefighters at an incident.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 79.]

Impounding equipment

31.7   If, in the course of an emergency incident, a firefighter suffers serious injury or death, or is involved in an accident involving a risk of serious injury or death, the senior firefighter present must immediately impound the protective and other equipment used by the firefighter and keep the equipment out of service until released by the Board.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 79.]

Equipment defects

31.8   The employer must, without delay, notify the Board of any structural failure or manufacturing defects detected in a firefighting vehicle, apparatus, or other emergency equipment referred to in this Part.

Test records

31.9   The employer must keep the test and inspection records required by this part available at the workplace for inspection by an officer or the joint committee or worker health and safety representative, as applicable.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 80.]

Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment

General requirement

31.10   Firefighters must wear personal protective clothing and equipment appropriate to the hazards to which they may be exposed.

Maintenance

31.11   (1) The employer must have written procedures for the inspection of protective clothing and equipment at regular intervals.

(2) Procedures for cleaning and drying protective clothing must be in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions.

(3) Defective items of protective clothing or equipment must be repaired or replaced.

Firefighter responsibility

31.12   Firefighters must ensure that the personal protective clothing and equipment used by them is maintained in good condition.

Safety headgear

31.13   (1) Safety headgear must be worn by firefighters required to approach the seat of a fire or enter a structure or other hazardous area during an incident.

(2) Safety headgear must meet the requirements of NFPA 1972, Helmets for Structural Firefighting: Structural Fire Fighters Helmets, 1992 Edition.

(3) Headgear meeting the requirements for safety headgear in Part 8 (Personal Protective Clothing and Equipment) may be used by firefighters

(a) while determining the cause of fires, or carrying out duties associated with preventing fires, or

(b) at the discretion of the incident commander, while fighting a fire in vegetation that is not within a structure.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

Protective coats, pants and hoods

31.14   Firefighters required to approach the seat of a fire or enter a structure or other hazardous area during an incident must wear protective coats, pants and hoods meeting the requirements of

(a) NFPA 1971, Protective Clothing for Structural Fire Fighting, 1991 Edition, or

(b) CGSB Standard CAN/CGSB-155.1-M88, Firefighters' Protective Clothing for Protection Against Heat and Flame.

(c) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 26 (c).]

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 26.]

Stationwear and personal garments

31.15   Firefighters required to approach the seat of a fire or enter a structure or other hazardous area during an emergency incident must not wear shirts, trousers, jackets or coveralls that have poor thermal stability or that ignite easily.

[am. B.C. Reg. 185/99, s. 79.]

Working gloves

31.16   Firefighters required to approach the seat of a fire or enter a structure or other hazardous area during an emergency incident must wear gloves meeting the requirements of NFPA 1973, Gloves for Structural Fire Fighting, 1988 Edition.

[am. B.C. Regs. 185/99, s. 79; 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

Fall protection

31.17   (1) A firefighter working on an aerial ladder must wear a safety belt and lanyard meeting the requirements of CSA Standard Z259.1-95, Safety Belts and Lanyards, and the securing lanyard must limit a fall to no more than 30 cm (12 in).

(2) A firefighter located on an aerial platform must wear a full body harness and lanyard meeting the requirements of Part 11 (Fall Protection).

(3) Rescue ropes, rappelling lines and safety belts and harnesses including safety hooks, rope grabs, lowering devices, and related equipment must meet the requirements of NFPA 1983, Fire Service Life Safety Rope, Harness and Hardware, 1990 Edition.

(4) The incident commander may depart from the requirements of Part 11 (Fall Protection) to use a fall protection system if, in the incident commander's opinion, such compliance is not practicable or may create a greater hazard, but subsections (1) to (3) of this section must be complied with.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. A, s. 4; 312/2003, App. A, ss. 4 and 5.]

Personal alert safety system

31.18   (1) A firefighter must be provided with and use a Personal Alert Safety System (PASS) when involved in duties which require a self-contained breathing apparatus to be worn.

(2) A PASS device must meet the requirements of NFPA 1982, Personal Alert Safety Systems (PASS) for Fire Fighters, 1993 Edition.

(3) A PASS device must be tested at least weekly and prior to use.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 67.]

Respiratory Protection

General

31.19   Firefighters who may be exposed to an oxygen deficient atmosphere or to harmful concentrations of air contaminants must wear a self-contained breathing apparatus of a positive pressure type having a rated minimum duration of 30 minutes.

Fitness to use SCBA

31.20   A physician's certificate of fitness to use self-contained breathing apparatus must be provided to the employer by a firefighter who

(a) experiences breathing difficulty while using the apparatus, or

(b) is known to have heart disease, impaired pulmonary function, or any other condition that might make it dangerous for the firefighter to use self-contained breathing apparatus.

Operation of SCBA

31.21   Respirators must be used in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.4-02, Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators, Clause 9.1.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5; 20/2006, s. 8.]

Sealing and fit testing

31.22   (1) Firefighters who use a self-contained breathing apparatus must be clean shaven to ensure that the mask forms a positive seal against the face.

(2) Fit tests must be performed in accordance with procedures in CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.4-02, Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators.

(2.1) A fit test must be carried out

(a) before initial use of a respirator,

(b) at least once a year,

(c) whenever there is a change in respirator facepiece, including the brand, model, and size, and

(d) whenever changes to the user's physical condition could affect the respirator fit.

(3) Personal protective equipment that is worn with self-contained breathing apparatus and might interfere with a proper fit must be worn during the fit test.

(4) Only corrective eyewear designed for use with self-contained breathing apparatus may be worn.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5; 20/2006, s. 9.]

Entry into buildings

31.23   (1) When self-contained breathing apparatus must be used to enter a building, or similar enclosed location, the entry must be made by a team of at least 2 firefighters.

(2) Effective voice communication must be maintained between firefighters inside and outside the enclosed location.

(3) During the initial attack stages of an incident at least one firefighter must remain outside.

(4) A suitably equipped rescue team of at least 2 firefighters must be established on the scene before sending in a second entry team and not more than 10 minutes after the initial attack.

(5) The rescue team required by subsection (4) must not engage in any duties that limit their ability to make a prompt response to rescue an endangered firefighter while interior structural firefighting is being conducted.

Air quality and sampling

31.24   (1) The employer must ensure that air used for breathing purposes meets the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z180.1-00, Compressed Breathing Air and Systems.

(2) The air must be tested at least once annually in a manner acceptable to the Board.

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5; 20/2006, s. 10.]

Spare equipment

31.25   (1) When self-contained breathing apparatus are used, the employer must ensure there are at least 4 apparatus available.

(2) At least one spare compressed air cylinder, having a rated minimum duration of 30 minutes, must be maintained at full rated capacity and available for each self-contained breathing apparatus.

Maintenance and records

31.26   (1) Self-contained breathing apparatus, including regulators, must be serviced and repaired by qualified persons.

(2) Inspection of compressed air cylinders must be done in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.4-02, Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators.

(3) Compressed air cylinders must be hydrostatically tested in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA-B339-96, Cylinders, Spheres, and Tubes for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods.

(4) Complete maintenance and repair records for each self-contained breathing apparatus and all air cylinders must be kept in accordance with the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.4-02, Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators (section 10.3.3.2.2-b to f, inclusive).

[am. B.C. Regs. 312/2003, App. B, s. 68; 20/2006, s. 11.]

Transportation

Seating

31.27   (1) Firefighters being transported by firefighting vehicles must ride in properly secured seats equipped with seat belts and providing not less than 41 cm (16 in) seating width for each occupant.

(2) The seats of all new firefighting vehicles ordered after April 15, 1998 must be equipped with headrests or other effective whiplash protection.

Communication

31.28   Crew cabs on firefighting vehicles must have an effective means of voice communication between the driver and passengers.

Enclosed crew cabs

31.29   (1) Enclosed crew cabs on firefighting vehicles must be equipped with interior lights, and adequately ventilated.

(2) New firefighting vehicles ordered after April 15, 1998 must have fully enclosed crew cabs meeting the requirements of NFPA 1901, Automotive Fire Apparatus, 1991 Edition.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

Stowing equipment

31.30   All equipment on a firefighting vehicle must be adequately secured.

Safe movement of vehicles

31.31   A firefighting vehicle must not be moved if the vision of the driver is obscured, except on a signal from a designated person, who must ensure that the vehicle can be moved safely.

Vehicle exhaust in firehalls

31.32   Unless air monitoring shows that levels of vehicle exhaust gas components are below the exposure limits established under section 5.48, effective local venting for the exhaust gases must be provided in vehicle areas in firehalls.

[am. B.C. Reg. 315/2003, App. A, s. 16.]

Aerial Devices and Ground Ladders

General

31.33   An aerial device used for firefighting must meet the requirements of NFPA 1904, Aerial Ladder and Elevating Platform Fire Apparatus, 1991 Edition.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

Nondestructive testing

31.34   (1) A fire department aerial device must be inspected and tested in accordance with good engineering practice at intervals not exceeding 12 months, and certified as safe for use by a professional engineer or the equipment manufacturer.

(2) The inspection and testing of a fire department aerial device must be done in accordance with the requirements of NFPA 1914, Testing Fire Department Aerial Devices, 1991 Edition.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

Controls

31.35   The turntable on an aerial device must be fitted with a positive locking device to hold it in any desired position.

Operator location

31.36   During the operation of an aerial device an operator must be present at the lower controls in sight of and in voice contact with any firefighters upon the device.

Ground ladders

31.37   (1) A ground ladder used by firefighters must meet the requirements of NFPA 1931, Design of and Design Verification Tests for Fire Department Ground Ladders, 1989 Edition.

(2) A ground ladder must be used, tested and maintained in accordance with the requirements of NFPA 1932, Use, Maintenance, and Service Testing of Fire Department Ground Ladders, 1989 Edition.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. A, s. 5.]

Other Equipment

Flashlights and hand lanterns

31.38   Battery operated flashlights and hand lanterns that are CSA approved for hazardous locations classified under the CSA Standard C22.1-94, Canadian Electrical Code Part 1, as Class 1, Division 2, Groups A, B, and C must be provided as follows:

(a) one flashlight for each firefighter;

(b) at least 4 hand lanterns for each firefighting vehicle.

Plaster hooks and pike poles

31.39   Plaster hooks and pike poles must be fitted with electrically non-conductive shafts.

Part 32 — Evacuation and Rescue

Repealed

32.1   Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. D, s. 34.]

Training

32.2   (1) Workers designated to provide rescue or evacuation services must be adequately trained.

(2) The training program must include simulated rescue or evacuation exercises and regular retraining, appropriate to the type of rescue or evacuation being provided, and training records must be kept.

Equipment

32.3   (1) Workers performing rescue or evacuation must wear personal protective clothing and equipment appropriate to the hazards likely to be encountered.

(2) Harnesses must meet the requirements of the applicable standards or code issued by the International Union of Alpinist Associations, National Fire Protection Association or Canadian Standards Association.

(3) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 69 (b).]

(4) When a platform suspended from a crane or hoist or attached to a crane boom is used for rescue, an injured worker on the platform is not required to use a personal fall protection system, if

(a) the worker is belted to a stretcher and the stretcher is securely fastened to the platform floor, and

(b) the platform has a safety strap that will prevent the platform from falling more than 15 cm (6 in) if the platform becomes dislodged from the hook.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 69.]

Ropes

32.4   (1) Ropes and associated rigging equipment used only for rescue or evacuation or training in such procedures must

(a) be of low stretch (static) kernmantle construction or equivalent,

(b) when new, have a minimum safety factor of 10 to 1, based upon a one-person load of 140 kilograms (300 pounds), and

(c) be replaced at intervals stated by the manufacturer, but not exceeding 5 years.

(2) A worker suspended on a rope for rescue purposes other than from a helicopter must, where practicable, be secured to an independent lifeline or belay line.

Inspection of equipment

32.5   (1) Ropes and associated equipment must be inspected visually and physically by qualified workers after each use for rescue, evacuation or training purposes.

(2) Equipment must not be used after it

(a) has been overstressed,

(b) has been subject to temperatures above 150°C (300°F), or

(c) shows significant damage due to contact with chemicals or due to any other cause.

Maintenance records

32.6   (1) Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 70 (b).]

(2) Maintenance records must be kept, including but not limited to

(a) the name of manufacturer,

(b) the type of equipment,

(c) the date put into service,

(d) when and for what purpose the equipment has been used,

(e) the date of the last inspection and name of the inspecting person,

(f) any damage suffered, and

(g) the date and nature of any maintenance.

(3) Maintenance records must be available upon request to any worker concerned with the safe operation of the equipment or to an officer.

[am. B.C. Reg. 312/2003, App. B, s. 70.]

First aid

32.7   At least one member of a rescue team must be a first aid attendant trained to immobilize an injured worker.

[en. B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 11.]

Communications

32.8   Effective communications must be maintained between the workers engaged in rescue or evacuation and support persons.

Work areas over water

32.9   If workers are required to work in places from which they could fall and drown, and are not protected by guardrails or other means of fall protection permitted by this Regulation, the employer must provide

(a) a suitable rescue boat, equipped with a boat hook, available at the site and capable of being used for rescue at all times,

(b) a buoyant apparatus attached to a nylon rope not less than 9 mm (3/8 in) in diameter, and not less than 15 m (50 ft) in length, and

(c) a sufficient number of workers who are available when work is underway to implement rescue procedures and who are properly equipped and instructed in those procedures.

Part 33

Repealed

33.1-
33.52
 
Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 348/2003, s. 12.]

Part 34 — Rope Access

Definitions

34.1   In this Part:

"anchor", also known as an anchorage connector, means a component or subsystem of a rope access system used to connect other parts of the rope access system to an anchorage;

"anchorage" means anything to which an anchor can be connected or secured, including a building, structure, tree or rock;

"full body harness" means a body support device

(a) consisting of connected straps designed to distribute the forces resulting from the suspension or fall of a person over at least the person's thighs, shoulders and pelvis, and

(b) with provision for connecting a lanyard, a rope or other components;

"lanyard" means a flexible length of rope that is used to connect a sit harness or full body harness to other parts of a rope access system or to an anchorage;

"rope" means a length of cord or webbing made of parallel, twisted or braided synthetic fibres or steel wire;

"rope access" means a technique in which a rope access system is used to provide a person with access to and from a workplace, commonly including suspension at the workplace, in such a way that a fall is prevented or arrested;

"rope access system" means a system consisting of

(a) a sit harness or full body harness,

(b) rope, lanyards and other connecting equipment,

(c) anchors, and

(d) other components such as ascenders, descenders, belay devices, backup devices and fall arresters,

that usually employs 2 separately secured subsystems, one as a means of access and the other as a safety, secondary, belay or backup system, but does not include a boatswain's chair, also known as a bosun's chair, or a zipline;

"sit harness" means a body support device consisting of thigh and waist loops.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Scope of application

34.2   (1) Subject to subsection (2), this Part applies to the use of rope access in a workplace.

(2) This Part does not apply to the following:

(a) scaling operations described in sections 20.96 to 20.101;

(b) a climber, as defined in section 26.7.1 (1);

(c) firefighters and firefighting activities under Part 31;

(d) evacuation and rescue, and training in such procedures, under Part 32.

(3) The use of rope access in a workplace is subject to section 11.2.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Rope access plan

34.3   (1) Before a rope access system is installed or used in a workplace, a written rope access plan must be prepared and be available at the workplace.

(2) The rope access plan must include all of the following information:

(a) the hazards associated with the work to be performed;

(b) how the hazards and associated risks will be eliminated or controlled;

(c) a description of the rope access system to be used at the workplace;

(d) a description of the types and locations of the anchorages to be used at the workplace;

(e) the procedures to be used to assemble, maintain, inspect, use and disassemble the rope access system;

(f) the name and duties of each member of the work team;

(g) the appropriate personal protective equipment to be used;

(h) the emergency response, evacuation and rescue procedures.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Training and certification

34.4   (1) Before allowing a person to perform rope access, the employer must ensure and document that the person

(a) has received training in the safe use of a rope access system, including, as appropriate to the work being done, the safe work practices, skills and practical experience hours described in one of the following groups of publications:

(i) International Code of Practice (2013) and General requirements for certification of personnel engaged in industrial rope access methods, Edition 6 (June 2009), published by the Industrial Rope Access Trade Association;

(ii) Safe Practices for Rope Access Work (August 2012) and Certification Requirements for Rope Access Work (November 2012), published by the Society of Professional Rope Access Technicians;

(iii) Scope of Practice (2012), Technical Handbook for Professional Mountain Guides (1999) and Climbing Gym Instructor Technical Manual (2003), published by the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides;

(iv) Cave Guiding Standards for British Columbia and Alberta (January 2004), published by the Canadian Cave Conservancy, and Companion Rescue Workshop (2011), published by British Columbia Cave Rescue, and

(b) holds a valid certificate of the training referred to in paragraph (a) issued by a body or association referred to in subparagraphs (i) to (iv) of that paragraph.

(2) The certificate referred to in subsection (1) (b) must be available at the workplace and produced for inspection on the request of an officer.

(3) Before allowing a person to perform rope access, the employer must ensure and document that the person is trained in the rope access plan and knows that person's duties under the plan.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2; am. B.C. Reg. 14/2019, App. F, s. 5.]

Safe work practices

34.5   A person performing rope access must comply with, as appropriate to the work being done, the safe work practices described in one of the groups of publications set out in section 34.4 (1) (a) (i) to (iv).

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Two-rope system

34.6   (1) In this section, "two-rope system" means a rope access system that includes a working line and a safety, secondary, belay or backup line.

(2) A person performing rope access must use a two-rope system unless one or both of the following apply:

(a) the primary means of support for the person performing rope access is provided by a building, a structure or the ground and not by a rope access system;

(b) in the case of rope access performed

(i) in the course of mountaineering or caving, or

(ii) in a climbing gym,

using a two-rope system may result in a greater hazard than if a single-rope system is used.

(3) In a two-rope system, the working line and the safety, secondary, belay or backup line must

(a) have independent connection points to the system's anchor or anchorage, and

(b) be independently connected to the harness of the person performing rope access.

(4) For the purposes of subsection (3) (b), the working line and the safety, secondary, belay or backup line may be independently connected to a single connection point on the harness of the person performing rope access.

(5) A person must not connect a safety, secondary, belay or backup line to a sternal connection point on the person's full body harness except as permitted by the manufacturer of the harness.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Personal log

34.7   (1) A person who performs rope access must maintain a personal log containing a record of the rope access performed by the person.

(2) The records in the personal log must be kept in chronological order and, unless otherwise provided for in a group of publications set out in section 34.4 (1) (a) (i) to (iv) that is appropriate to the work being done, the entry for each day of work must be verified and signed by the rope access supervisor or the manager in charge.

(3) The records in the personal log must include all of the following information:

(a) the date on which the rope access was performed;

(b) the type of work performed;

(c) the type of rope access system used for the work;

(d) the type of building or structure worked on;

(e) the number of hours worked using rope access.

(4) The person must keep the personal log current and available at the workplace for inspection by an officer.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Rescue

34.8   The employer must ensure that a person performing rope access can be promptly rescued, in accordance with the procedures described in the rope access plan referred to in section 34.3 (1), in the event of an equipment malfunction, a fall or an injury or the person's incapacity to self-rescue.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Equipment

34.9   (1) Equipment used for a rope access system must

(a) consist of components that are compatible and suitable for the intended use, and

(b) be suitable for the environment in which the equipment is used.

(2) Unless otherwise provided for under section 34.12 (1) or 34.13 (2), equipment of a type set out in Column 1 of Schedule 34-A must meet the requirements of, and be used in accordance with, one of the applicable standards set out opposite that type of equipment in Column 2.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Inspection and maintenance

34.10   Equipment used for a rope access system must be

(a) inspected for defects by a person intending to use the rope access system before the rope access system is first used on each work shift,

(b) inspected in the manner and at the frequency required by the manufacturer of the equipment, and

(c) kept free from substances and conditions that could contribute to the deterioration of the equipment.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Anchors and anchorages

34.11   (1) An anchor for a rope access system must be reliable.

(2) A person must not connect or secure a rope access system to an anchorage unless the anchorage is reliable and capable of safely withstanding any forces that may be applied to the anchorage by persons using the rope access system.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Permanent anchors

34.12   (1) A permanent anchor for a rope access system must have an ultimate load capacity, in any direction in which the load may be applied, of at least 22.2 kN (5 000 lbf) for each person connected to the permanent anchor.

(2) In addition to the requirement under section 34.10 (b) and in accordance with sections 7.3.2, 7.3.3 and 7.4, as applicable, of CSA Standard Z91-02 (R2013) Health and Safety Code for Suspended Equipment Operations,

(a) a permanent anchor for a rope access system must be inspected, at least once a year, and tested, and

(b) the results of the inspection and testing must be documented.

(3) A permanent anchor for a rope access system, and its installation, must be certified by a professional engineer.

(4) Subsections (2) and (3) do not apply to a permanent anchor for a rope access system used in the course of mountaineering or caving.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Temporary anchors

34.13   (1) In this section, "temporary anchor" means an anchor that is removed from service immediately after use.

(2) A temporary anchor for a rope access system must have an ultimate load capacity, in any direction in which the load may be applied, of at least 12 kN (2 700 lbf) for each person connected to the temporary anchor.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Safety headgear

34.14   Despite section 8.11, a person performing rope access must wear headgear that

(a) is appropriate for the work being done,

(b) is equipped with a chin strap having at least 3 separate points of connection to the helmet shell,

(c) is secured in accordance with the specifications of the manufacturer of the headgear, and

(d) meets the requirements of one or more of the following standards:

(i) CSA Standard CAN/CSA-Z94.1-05 or CAN/CSA-Z94.1-15, Industrial protective headwear — Performance, selection, care, and use;

(ii) ANSI Standard ANSI/ISEA Z89.1-2009 or ANSI/ISEA Z89.1-2014, American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection;

(iii) British Safety Institution Standard BS EN 12492:2012 Mountaineering equipment — Helmets for mountaineers — Safety requirements and test methods;

(iv) British Safety Institution Standard BS EN 397:2012+A1:2012 Industrial safety helmets;

(v) UIAA Standard UIAA 106 Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment — Helmets.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2; am. B.C. Reg. 14/2019, App. A, s. 2.]

Maximum arrest force, clearance

34.15   (1) In this section, "maximum arrest force" means the peak shock load that a rope access system imposes on the body of a person connected to the rope access system when stopping the person's fall.

(2) A rope access system must

(a) limit the maximum arrest force to not more than 6 kN (1 350 lbf), and

(b) minimize the risk of a person connected to the rope access system striking a lower surface or object, or swinging and striking a surface or object, in a manner that could cause injury.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Removal from service

34.16   (1) Equipment used for a rope access system must be removed from service

(a) as specified by the manufacturer of the equipment, or

(b) if the equipment is defective.

(2) Equipment that is removed from service must not be returned to service until it has been inspected and recertified, by the manufacturer or a professional engineer, as meeting the requirements of section 34.9.

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Schedule 34-A

[en. B.C. Reg. 199/2014, App. K, s. 2.]

Standards for Equipment Used in Rope Access Systems

Column 1
Type of Equipment
Column 2
Standards
AnchorsCAN/CSA Z259.15-12 Anchorage Connectors (published January, 2012)
CAN/CSA Z271-10 Safety code for suspended platforms (published September, 2010)
EN 795:2012 Personal fall protection equipment — Anchor devices (published September 30, 2013)
ConnectorsANSI/ASSE 359.12-2009 Connecting Components for Personal Fall Arrest Systems (published November 16, 2009)
CSA Z259.12-11 Connecting components for personal fall arrest systems (PFAS) (published November, 2011)
EN 362:2004 Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Connectors (published June 30, 2005)
EN 12275:2013 Mountaineering equipment — Connectors — Safety requirements and test methods (published October 31, 2013)
UIAA 121 Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment — Connectors/Karabiners (published March 8, 2013)
Energy absorbersEN 355:2002 Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Energy absorbers (published November 30, 2002)
HarnessesCAN/CSA Z259.10-12 Full body harnesses (published February, 2012)
EN 361:2002 Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Full body harnesses (published July 4, 2002)
EN 813:2008 Personal fall protection equipment — Sit harnesses (published February 28, 2009)
EN 12277:2007 Mountaineering equipment — Harnesses — Safety requirements and test methods (published August 31, 2007)
UIAA 105 Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment — Harnesses (published May 30, 2014)
LanyardsEN 354:2010 Personal fall protection equipment — Lanyards (published January 31, 2011)
RopeCordage Institute CI 1801-07 Low Stretch and Static Kernmantle Life Safety Rope (published October, 2007)
EN 892:2012 Mountaineering equipment — Dynamic mountaineering ropes — Safety requirements and test methods (published February 28, 2013)
EN 1891:1998 Personal protective equipment for the prevention of falls from a height — Low stretch kernmantel ropes (published October 31, 1998)
NFPA 1983 Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services, 2012 Edition (published January 2, 2012)
UIAA 101 Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment — Dynamic Ropes (published June 26, 2014)
UIAA 107 Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment — Low Stretch Ropes (published March 8, 2013)
Rope adjustment devices, including ascenders, back up devices, belay devices, descenders, fall arresters and rope clampsCAN/CSA Z259.2.3-12 Descent devices (published January, 2012)
EN 341:2011 Personal fall protection equipment — Descender devices for rescue (published December 31, 2011)
EN 353-2:2002 Personal protective equipment against falls from a height — Part 2: Guided type fall arresters including a flexible anchor line (published November 30, 2002)
EN 567:2013 Mountaineering equipment — Rope clamps — Safety requirements and test methods (published September 30, 2013)
EN 12841:2006 Personal fall protection equipment — Rope access systems — Rope adjustment devices (published February 28, 2007)
UIAA 126 Mountaineering and Climbing Equipment — Rope Clamps (published March 8, 2013)

Contents | Parts 1 to 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Parts 10 to 11 | Part 12 | Part 13 | Part 14 | Part 15 | Part 16 | Parts 17 to 18 | Part 19 | Part 20 | Part 21 | Part 22 | Part 23 | Part 24 | Parts 25 to 26 | Part 27 | Part 28 | Parts 29 to 34 | Schedules