B.C. Reg. 100/2004
M58/2004
Deposited March 23, 2004
effective April 1, 2004

Safety Standards Act

Electrical Safety Regulation

Note: Check the Cumulative Regulation Bulletin 2014
for any non-consolidated amendments to this regulation that may be in effect.

[includes amendments up to B.C. Reg. 202/2012, October 1, 2012]

Point in Time

Contents
1Definition for the Act
2Definitions
3Application to utilities
3.1Residential electricity consumption
3.2Relation to the Safety Standards General Regulation
Part 1 — General Qualification and Licensing Provisions
 Division 1 — Individuals Who May Perform Regulated Electrical Work
4Individuals who may perform electrical work
5Repealed
 Division 2 — Certificates of Qualification for Field Safety Representatives
6Who may apply for a certificate of qualification as a field safety representative
7Classes of field safety representative
8Requirements for classes A, B or C certificates for industry training credential holders
9Field safety representative certificates for applied technologists
10Field safety representative certificates for professional engineers
Part 2 — Permits, Inspections and Regulated Products
 Division 1 — Permits
11Permits for electrical work
12Supervision ratios under installation permits
13Exemption if electrical work subsumed in permit for elevating device or gas work
14Operating permit
15Operating permit not required
16Duties of a utility representative named on an operating permit
17When a homeowner may perform electrical work under a permit
18When permit is not required for electrical work
19Inspection of electrical work
 Division 2 — Regulated Product Standards and Certification
20Canadian Electrical Code adopted as B.C. Electrical Code
20.1Certification agencies
21Certification or approval mark required for electrical equipment
Schedule

Definition for the Act

1  For the purposes of the Act, "electrical equipment" includes apparatus, conduits, plant, pipes, poles, works and any other regulated product that is used, designed or intended for use for or in connection with the generation, transmission, supply, distribution, or use of electrical energy for any purpose.

Definitions

2  In this regulation:

"Act" means the Safety Standards Act;

"B.C. Electrical Code" means the B.C. Electrical Code adopted under section 20;

"electrical work" means regulated work in respect of electrical equipment;

"fully detached dwelling" means any of the following if occupied or intended by the owner to be occupied as a permanent residence:

(a) any detached building containing only one dwelling unit;

(b) a manufactured home as defined in the Manufactured Home Act;

(c) a recreational vehicle;

"homeowner" means the owner of a fully detached dwelling who lives in or intends to live in that dwelling as a permanent residence;

"industry training credential" has the meaning in the Industry Training Authority Act;

"licence" means a licence issued by a provincial safety manager in respect of electrical equipment;

"licensed electrical contractor" means a person who holds a licence as a licensed contractor in respect of electrical equipment;

"manufacturer's technical representative" means an individual authorized by the manufacturer of a regulated electrical product to provide technical services in respect of that product;

"regulatory authority" means the ministry or local government which provides for an inspection service and has authority to require inspection of electrical work in an area of British Columbia;

"rough wiring" means a phase of construction in which an electrical installation is fully accessible for inspection;

"testing" means the evaluation and verification of electrical equipment by means of instruments and testing devices;

"utility" means a person who owns or operates equipment or facilities in British Columbia for the generation, transmission or distribution of electricity or communication signals that are for sale.

[am. B.C. Reg. 327/2005, Sch. 1, s. 1.]

Application to utilities

3  (1) This regulation, except for section 3.1, does not apply to a public utility as defined in the Utilities Commission Act in the exercise of its function as a utility with respect to the generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy.

(2) Despite subsection (1), this regulation applies to the electrical equipment owned or in the possession or control of a public utility if the electrical equipment is not used directly in the generation, transmission and distribution of electrical energy.

[am. B.C. Reg. 198/2006, s. (a).]

Residential electricity consumption

3.1  The range of electricity consumption prescribed for the purposes of the definition of "residential electricity information" in section 19.1 of the Act is 93 kilowatt-hours per day or more, averaged over one billing cycle.

[en. B.C. Reg. 198/2006, s. (b).]

Relation to the Safety Standards General Regulation

3.2  This regulation is subject to the Safety Standards General Regulation.

[en. B.C. Reg. 134/2009, s. 2.]

Part 1 — General Qualification and Licensing Provisions

Division 1 — Individuals Who May Perform Regulated Electrical Work

Individuals who may perform electrical work

4  (1) Subject to subsection (2), an individual must not perform regulated work in respect of electrical equipment unless the individual

(a) holds an appropriate industry training credential in respect of electrical work,

(b) has successfully completed training recognized by a provincial safety manager,

(c) is employed by an organization that utilizes training programs that are approved by a provincial safety manager and the individual

(i)   has successfully completed the relevant training, and

(ii)   does not perform regulated work for any person other than the individual's employer who provided the training,

(d) is a homeowner acting in accordance with section 17,

(e) is a manufacturer's technical representative,

(f) holds another certificate of qualification under the Gas Safety Regulation or the Power Engineers, Boiler, Pressure Vessel and Refrigeration Safety Regulation, or

(g) is permitted to do so under section 5 of the Safety Standards General Regulation.

(2) Any right referred to in subsection (1) to perform electrical work is limited by

(a) any exception under this regulation,

(b) any terms and conditions imposed under a permission issued under the Act, or

(c) by the scope of the individual's certificate of qualification or industry training credential.

(3) For the purposes of section 5 of the Safety Standards General Regulation or section 12 of this regulation, only an individual referred to in subsection (1) (a), (b), (c) or (f) of this section is authorized to supervise a person to do electrical work.

Repealed

5  Repealed. [B.C. Reg. 327/2005, Sch. 1, s. 2.]

Division 2 — Certificates of Qualification for Field Safety Representatives

Who may apply for a certificate of qualification as a field safety representative

6  Only the following individuals are eligible to apply for a certificate of qualification as a field safety representative:

(a) an individual referred to in section 4 (1) (a) to (c);

(b) an applied technologist referred to in section 9 (1);

(c) a professional engineer referred to in section 10 (1).

Classes of field safety representative

7  (1) Class A, class B and class C certificates of qualification as a field safety representative are established.

(2) The classes of certificate established under subsection (1) are in addition to other certificates of qualification for electrical work issued by a provincial safety manager.

(3) The holder of a class A certificate of qualification may make declarations for any type of electrical work.

(4) The holder of a class B, certificate of qualification may make declarations only with respect to electrical installations in which the voltage of the completed installation does not exceed 750 volts.

(5) The holder of a class C, certificate of qualification may make declarations only with respect to electrical installations in which the current and voltage in the installation do not exceed current of 200 amps and voltage of 150 volts to ground, single phase power.

Requirements for classes A, B or C certificates for industry training credential holders

8  (1) In order to obtain a certificate of qualification for Class A, B or C as a field safety representative under section 7, an individual must

(a) hold an appropriate industry training credential,

(b) complete a course in the application of electrical codes and standards required by the provincial safety manager, and

(c) pass an examination required by the provincial safety manager.

(2) In order to obtain a class A certificate of qualification as a field safety representative under this section, an individual must also complete three high voltage installations.

(3) An individual who qualifies for a class A certificate of qualification as a field safety representative may obtain a certificate of class B or C but may hold only one of those certificates at any time.

Field safety representative certificates for applied technologists

9  (1) An individual may apply to a provincial safety manager for a certificate of qualification as a field safety representative in one of the classes of certificates referred to in section 7 if the individual

(a) holds qualifications in electrical engineering technology,

(b) is registered as an applied science technologist under the Applied Science Technologists and Technicians Act,

(c) completes a course in the application of electrical codes and standards required by a provincial safety manager, and

(d) passes an examination required by the provincial safety manager.

(2) An applied technologist who applies for a class A or class B certificate of qualification as a field safety representative must have

(a) 2 years of work experience, acceptable to a provincial safety manager, after receiving a class C certificate of qualification as a field safety representative, or

(b) 3 years of work experience, acceptable to a provincial safety manager, with electrical installations in which the voltage of installation is more than 150 volts to ground.

(3) An applied technologist who applies for a class C certificate of qualification as a field safety representative must have one year of work experience acceptable to a provincial safety manager.

[en. B.C. Reg. 475/2004, Sch. 1.]

Field safety representative certificates for professional engineers

10  (1) An individual who holds qualifications in electrical engineering and is a member in good standing with the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia may apply to a provincial safety manager to obtain a certificate of qualification as a field safety representative in one of the classes of certificate of qualifications as a field safety representative referred to in section 7 if the individual passes an examination required by the provincial safety manager.

(2) A professional engineer who applies for a class A or class B certificate of qualification as a field safety representative must have two years of work experience acceptable to a provincial safety manager.

Part 2 — Permits, Inspections and Regulated Products

Division 1 — Permits

Permits for electrical work

11  (1) When electrical work is performed on electrical equipment, a permit is required

(a) for each structure with a separate electrical supply, or

(b) for each portion of a structure with a separate electrical supply service.

(2) A permit is required for any electrical work that requires the attendance of a utility to connect or reconnect an electrical service.

Supervision ratios under installation permits

12  (1) In this section:

"main consumer service" has the same meaning as in the Canadian Electrical Code;

"trainee" means a trainee under the Industry Training Authority Act.

(2) For the purposes of doing regulated work under an installation permit for electrical equipment in which the field safety representative named in the permit is a person who holds a certificate of qualification of class A, B or C, a person authorized to supervise under section 4 (3) may supervise

(a) up to 4 individuals for installations derived from a 3 wire 120/240 volt grounded neutral system, if the rating of the main consumer service equipment does not exceed 200 amps, or

(b) in any other case, 1 or 2 trainees.

(3) For the purposes of doing regulated work under an installation permit for electrical equipment in which a field safety representative of any class other than class A, B or C is named on the installation permit, the field safety representative may supervise only one or two individuals.

[am. B.C. Reg. 327/2005, Sch. 1, s. 3.]

Exemption if electrical work subsumed in permit for elevating device or gas work

13  If a person holds a permit under the Elevating Devices Safety Regulation or the Gas Safety Regulation to do work on an elevating device or gas system that includes electrical work, no additional permit under this regulation is required to do the electrical work.

Operating permit

14  If electrical maintenance is performed on a building or premises, the application for the operating permit must include the name, class and certificate of qualification number of the field safety representative who will perform or supervise the regulated work under the permit.

Operating permit not required

15  An operating permit under this regulation is not required for a utility that is regulated under an enactment of Canada.

Duties of a utility representative named on an operating permit

16  (1) In this section, "utility representative" means individual specified in an application for an operating permit for a utility as the applicant's utility representative.

(2) A utility representative must provide the name, class and certificate of qualification number of at least one field safety representative who will perform or supervise all electrical work under the permit.

When a homeowner may perform electrical work under a permit

17  (1) Subject to this section, a homeowner may perform electrical work in their fully detached dwelling under an installation permit.

(2) An installation permit may be issued to a homeowner only if

(a) electricity is not fed or supplied from the fully detached dwelling to a separately owned or occupied property, and

(b) the electrical work involves only installations in which the current and voltage do not exceed current of 200 amps and voltage of 150 volts to ground, single phase power.

(3) An installation permit issued under subsection (2) does not authorize the issue of a permit to install the connection from a manufactured home or recreational vehicle to the power supply of a manufactured home park or recreational vehicle park.

(4) A homeowner who performs electrical work under an installation permit must request that the work be inspected by a safety officer

(a) if the work or a phase of the work is completed, promptly on that completion, or

(b) if no other inspection has been made within 180 days from the start of the permit, immediately before the expiry of the 180 day period.

(5) If an inspection is required after a request under subsection (4), the inspection must be made after completion of the electrical work and before

(a) the concealment of any portion of the rough wiring, and

(b) the connection of power to the electrical supply system.

(6) A homeowner may perform the electrical work in the homeowner's fully detached dwelling under an installation permit issued to a licensed electrical contractor for that work if

(a) the contractor who holds the permit supervises the work, and

(b) the homeowner only performs work referred to in subsection (2).

When permit is not required for electrical work

18  (1) No permit is required if the only electrical work performed is testing.

(2) An individual may replace the following regulated products without a permit, up to a maximum rating of 150 V to ground, with electrical equipment of a similar type or rating:

(a) receptacles;

(b) cord attachment plugs;

(c) snap switches;

(d) ballasts;

(e) dimmer switches;

(f) fan speed controllers;

(g) thermostats;

(h) overcurrent devices.

(3) An individual may replace, without a permit, a lamp of up to 347 V to ground with a lamp of a similar type or rating.

(4) An individual may replace, without a permit, a fuse of up to 750 V with a fuse of a similar type or rating.

(5) If a licensed electrical contractor or a manufacturer's technical representative performs repairs involving the components of existing installed and certified regulated electrical equipment, no permit is required if

(a) there are no modifications or additions to the electrical installation,

(b) neither the electrical rating nor the characteristics of the equipment is altered, and

(c) the replacement components are of a type which do not invalidate the original certification mark.

[am. B.C. Reg. 327/2005, Sch. 1, s. 4.]

Inspection of electrical work

19  (1) If a person holds an electrical installation permit, the field safety representative named on the permit must request an inspection at least once in every 180 day period.

(2) If no inspection request under subsection (1) has been submitted within a 180 day period, the holder of the permit must have the permit amended to allow for the extra time before performing any regulated work.

(3) On the completion of each phase of electrical work under an installation permit, the field safety representative named on the permit must request an inspection.

(4) A person must not do any of the following unless the regulated work has been inspected or the inspection has been waived:

(a) conceal any portion of the rough wiring;

(b) connect power to the electrical supply system;

(c) if the inspection is required for other than the last phase, work on the next phase of the electrical work.

(5) If an inspection is required for regulated work, other than the regulated work in the last phase, a person must not do regulated work on the next phase of electrical work.

(6) After receiving a request under subsection (1) or (3), the regulatory authority may require

(a) an inspection, or

(b) a declaration that the work performed under the permit complies with the Act and the regulations.

Division 2 — Regulated Product Standards and Certification

Canadian Electrical Code adopted as B.C. Electrical Code

20  The Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, Twenty-second Edition, Safety Standard for Electrical Installations, Canadian Standards Association Standard C22.1-12 is adopted in whole, including any errata and as if it were amended as set out in the Schedule to this regulation, as the B.C. Electrical Code Regulation 2012.

[am. B.C. Regs. 17/2007, Sch. 1, s. 1; 186/2009, s. (a); 202/2012, s. 1.]

Certification agencies

20.1  An organization accredited by the Standards Council of Canada under the Standards Council of Canada Act as an organization engaged in conformity assessment is a certification agency for the purposes of this regulation.

[en. B.C. Reg. 327/2005, Sch. 1, s. 5.]

Certification or approval mark required for electrical equipment

21  (1) Subject to subsections (3) and (4), a person must not use electrical equipment in British Columbia, or offer for sale, sell, display or otherwise dispose of electrical equipment for use in British Columbia, unless the electrical equipment displays a label or mark as follows:

(a) a certification mark;

(b) a label or mark of a certification agency that is acceptable to the appropriate provincial safety manager to certify electrical equipment for a specific installation;

(c) an approval mark issued under section 10 of the Act;

(d) in the case of used manufactured homes, used factory-built structures and used recreational vehicles, a label supplied by the appropriate provincial safety manager.

(2) An approval mark under subsection (1) (c) signifies compliance with requirements in respect of fire and electrical shock hazards only.

(3) Electrical equipment that does not require approval under the B.C. Electrical Code does not require a label or mark.

(4) Electrical equipment that has not been approved under subsection (1) may

(a) be displayed for not more than 14 days if the regulatory authority gives written permission to do so, or

(b) be used by a utility in its capacity as a utility if a professional engineer has certified that the use of the equipment is safe.

[am. B.C. Reg. 327/2005, Sch. 1, s. 6.]

Schedule

[en. B.C. Reg. 202/2012, s. 2.]

Deemed Amendments for Purposes of Adopting

Canadian Electrical Code

1 For the purposes of section 20 of this regulation, the Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, Twenty-second Edition, Canadian Standards Association Standard C22.1-12, is adopted as if it were amended as follows:

(a) in section 0 by deleting the definition of "Electrical contractor" and substituting the following:

"Electrical contractor" means a licensed electrical contractor, as defined in the Electrical Safety Regulation;

"National Building Code of Canada" means the British Columbia Building Code and local building bylaws; ,

(b) in section 4 by amending rule 4-004 (10) by striking out " Subrules 1(b) and 2(b)" and substituting "Subrules 1(a) and 2(a)",

(c) in section 76 by amending rule 76-016 by adding " except by special permission" after "Class A Type",

(d) in Table 2

(i) in column 1 by striking out the eighth item, " 2", and substituting "2§§" and by striking out the eleventh item, "00", and substituting "00§§", and

(ii) in the notes immediately below the table by adding the following:

§§For 3-wire 120/240 V and 120/208 V service conductors for single dwellings, or for feeder conductors supplying single dwelling units of row housing of apartment and similar buildings, and sized in accordance with Rules 8-200(1), 8-200(2), and 8-202(1), the allowable ampacity for sizes No. 2 AWG and No. 2/0 AWG with 90 ºC insulation terminating on equipment having a maximum conductor termination temperature of 75 ºC shall be 125 A and 200 A, respectively (see Rule 4-006). In this case, the 5% adjustment of Rule 8-106(1) cannot be applied. , and

(e) in Table 4

(i) in column 1 by striking out the fourth item, " 6", and substituting "6‡‡", by striking out the seventh item, "2", and substituting "2‡‡", by striking out the ninth item, "0", and substituting "0‡‡", by striking out the tenth item, "00", and substituting "00‡‡", by striking out the twelfth item, "0000", and substituting "0000‡‡" and by striking out the nineteenth item, "700", and substituting "700‡‡", and

(ii) in the notes immediately below the table by adding the following:

‡‡For 3-wire 120/240 V and 120/208 V service conductors for single dwellings, or for feeder conductors supplying single dwelling units of row housing of apartment and similar buildings, and sized in accordance with Rules 8-200(1), 8-200(2), and 8-202(1), the allowable ampacity for sizes No. 6 AWG, No. 2 AWG, No. 1/0 AWG, No. 2/0 AWG, No. 4/0 AWG and No. 700 kcmil with 90 ºC insulation terminating on equipment having a maximum conductor termination temperature of 75 ºC shall be 60 A, 100 A, 125 A, 150 A, 200 A and 400 A, respectively (see Rule 4-006). In this case, the 5% adjustment of Rule 8-106(1) cannot be applied.

[Provisions relevant to the enactment of this regulation: Safety Standards Act, S.B.C. 2003, c. 39, section 88]